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Melissa Muldoon, of Diario di una Studentessa Matta, and I recorded a special podcast episode for all of you to learn about Christmas phrases + traditions in Italy.

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

*If you're here and you wanted to see the show notes for the post on the word proprio, go here.

Italian phrases for Natale:

  • Buon Natale!(bwuon na-TA-ley) - Merry Christmas!
  • Buone feste! (bwuon-ey FEST-ey) - Happy Holidays!
  • Felice anno! (fuh-LEE-chay AHN-no) - Happy New Year!
  • Buon anno! (bwuon AHN-no) - Happy New Year!
  • Albero di Natale (al-BURR-oh dee na-TA-ley) - Chrismas Tree
  • Fare l’albero (FAR-ey al-BURR-oh) - Put up/decorate the tree
  • Gli addobbi (lyee ah-DOE-bee) - Ornaments
  • I decorazioni (ee deck-or-ah-ZEE-oh-ney) - Decorations
  • Decorare la casa (deck-or-ARE-ey la KA-za) - Decorate the house
  • Babbo Natale (ba-bo na-TA-ley) - Santa Clause
  • Babbo Natale arriva alla mezzanotte (ba-bo na-TA-ley ah-REE-va al-la mey-za-NO-tey) - Santa Clause arrives at midnight.
  • Le renne di Babbo Natale (ley REN-ney dee ba-bo na-TA-ley) - Santa Clause's reindeer
  • La slitta (la slee-tah) - sleigh
  • I tradizioni natalizie (ee tra-dee-zee-OH-nay na-ta-LEE-zee-ey) - Christmas traditions
  • Cappello di Natale (ka-PELL-oh dee na-TA-ley) - Santa's hat
  • I regali (ee rey-ga-lee) - Gifts
  • Apriamo i regali! (ah-pree-AH-mo ee rey-GA-lee) - Let's open the gifts!
  • le luci natalizie (ley LOO-chee na-ta-LEE-zee-ey) - Christmas lights
  • la vigilia di Natale (la vee-JEE-lee-ah dee na-TA-ley) - Christmas Eve
  • Andare a messa in chiesa (ahn-DAR-ay a MEY-sa een key-EY-za) - To go to mass
  • Pranzo di Natale con la famiglia (PRAHN-zo dee na-TA-ley cone la fa-ME-lyee-ah) - Christmas dinner with the family
  • Il cenone (eel chuh-NO-nay) - Big dinner

Phrases from Rossella's clip

  • Vengono allestiti (vain-GA-no ah-lay-STEE-tee) - Prepared

Allestire means to prepare, allestire una vetrina, allestira un mercatino

  • Ormai OR-my) - By now

Ormai questa è diventata una tradizione consolidata,

Una tradizione consolidata = an established tradition

  • Sulla sponda (SUE-la SPOAN-da) - On the banks (Qui nella piccola cittadina di Garda, sulla sponda veronese del lago... )
  • Innanzi tutto (ee-NAHN-zee TWO-toe) - First of all (Innanzi tutto quello che li caratterizza sono le piccole casette di legno allineate lungo percorsi pedonali fra le vie del paese.)
  • Le piccole casette di legno allineate lungo percorsi pedonali. (ley pea-KO-ley ka-SET-ey dee LANE-yo ah-leen-ee-AH-tey LOON-go pear-COR-see pey-do-na-lee) - the small houses built of wood lining the sidewalks
  • L'atmosfera è ancora più suggestiva. (laht-MO-sfear-ah eh ahn-CORE-ah PEW sue-gest-EE-va) - The atmosphere is even more striking.
  • Dagli stand arrivano profumi di cannella e di spezie! (da-lyee stand ah-REE-va-no pro-FU-me dee ca-NEL-la eh dee SPEZ-ee-ey) - The aromas of cinnamon and spices come from the stands!
  • Una grande pista di pattinaggio sul ghiaccio (ooh-na grahn-dey pea-sta dee paht-ee-NAH-joe sool gee-AH-cho) - a large skating rink

Resources mentioned:

Melissa's post about Christmas music

Italian Jingle Bells

Recipe for croccante on Melissa's site

Matta Designs - Melissa's store for Christmas gifts for the Italophile in your life

Italian Trips with Melissa

62 Classy (& Slightly Racy) Italian Expressions

Essential Italian Travel Phrases: How to Thrive Instead of Just Survive in Italy (a discount is available for you with this link!)

Direct download: EP_56_Revised.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:08pm PDT

There are some words in Italian that you'll hear again and again and not fully understand even after looking them up.

(Which words are like this for you? Leave them in the comments below!)

3 Main Ways to Use the Word Proprio in ItalianIf you think like me, you need lots of examples, to hear it a lot and to use it a lot in order for it to really stick.

One of these words for me has been proprio (pro/pree/oh).

And finally, after doing a ton of research, asking a lot of questions, and using it in the wrong context twenty-six plus times, here are 3 ways I figured out that I can use it.

The definition?

My Ciao textbook says that it means exactly or indeed.

My In viaggio textbook says that it means one's own or just, really, and exactly.

WordReference will tell you that it means all of these things:

  • exactly, precisely, really, truly, quite
  • own, typical, signature
  • of a specific name - proper
  • appropriate, suitable, fitting
  • one's own

Finally, dizionario corriere tell us that it means:

  • characteristic, specific, typical
  • subject of the third person in an impersonal phrase
  • suitable, appropriate
  • truly, really, precisely, exactly
  • to reinforce/emphasize a certain point

A lot, right?

Let's break it down to see how we can use it in actual conversation.

Hear it

Open this page and then click the blue play button. (He sounds a little like a Shakespearean drama teacher.)

3 main ways to use proprio

1.) In colloquial expressions

  • essere/sentirsi a proprio agio - to be at ease

If you were using this in conversation, you would say sono a mio agio/mi sento a mio agio.

  • sapere il fatto proprio - to know your stuff

Same here. So il fatto mio meaning I know my stuff. Sa il fatto suo meaning he knows his stuff.

  • amor proprio - self-esteem

" È possibile che non abbia un briciolo di amor proprio."* - It's possible that he doesn't have a shred of self-respect.

*http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=53528

2.) To express 'truly, really, exactly, precisely, or quite'

  • Non sapevo proprio. - I really don't know.
  • Essere proprio una capa tosta! (dialect that you'll find in Southern Italy) - To truly be pigheaded/stubborn (can be used for men/women without changing)
  • Proprio allora - Just then

"E quando penso che sia finita,
è proprio adesso che comincia la salita." - And when you think that it's over it's just then that the rise up starts."

(Want to hear the song this is from? Go to the end of the post!)

  • Proprio adesso - Right now
  • Proprio come - Just like, Just as

"Proprio come sei." - Just like you are.

(This is from a song by the lovely Mina. Look below to find it!)

Or if you were to translate Mr. Mars's song Just the Way You Are, you would get Proprio Così Come Sei.

  • Sei proprio un soggetto - You're seriously a weird person.

Un esempio da mio nonno adottivo :]

È proprio la possibilità di realizzare un sogno che rende la vita interessante. - It's truly the possibility of achieving a dream that makes life interesting. - Paulo Coelho

3.) To show the impersonal third person

Meaning: One's house, one's dog, one's Harry Potter collection

You don't know who this person is, why they exist or even if you're talking about someone specific. It's impersonal.

  • C’è anche un’opzione per condividere sui principali social network con i propri amici... - There is also the option of sharing on social networks with one's friends... (from this article on Rorschach)
  • a proprio rischio - at one's own risk
  • Come scrivere la storia della propria vita - how to write the story of one's life (which is actually a book!)

Your task:

Give me an example of you using the word proprio in a sentence!

Direct download: ICE_EP_56.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 6:56pm PDT

[Podcast 55] Mini-story: How can you talk about your favorite things? Pt. 5

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Key phrase/vocabulary: Piccola, felice, simpatica - Small, happy, nice

  • Bambino piccolo - small child
  • Questo piccolo grande amore - a song by Claudio Baglioni that means my great love - He was famous during the 70s and is considered one of the greatest songwriters in Italian music history.
  • Famiglia felice - happy family

Siamo una famiglia felice. - We are a happy family.

  • Rendere felice - to make happy

Il mio ragazzo mi rende felice. - My boyfriend makes me happy.

Key collocation: producono gli abiti - produces clothes

  • produrre - produce, yield, create, manufacture

*Used with making/producing clothes

  • Produrre in eccesso - overproduce

Key grammar: Quando sono stata in Italia, sono andata a Solomeo - When I was in Italy, I went to Solomeo.

Your task:

Have a glass of wine and tell me in the comments below (In Italian!) what kind of wine you had!

Resources mentioned:

Cos’è la “Terra dei fuochi” - article on Naples ? Caserta trash issue

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP55.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 10:24pm PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Key phrase/vocabulary: Che strano

  • Che tipo strano - Strange person - Usually drop strano and just say Che tipo, eh?
  • Strano aspetto - strange appearance - Meaning things like the latest Facebook update or your own physical body

Key collocation: Il mio stilista preferito è YSL

  • Il mio hobby preferito - my favorite hobby
  • Il mio passatempo preferito - my favorite pastime
  • Il mio film Italiano preferito - my favorite Italian movie

Key grammar: Ma forse se potessi permettermi quei vestiti, li comprei! - But maybe I could afford them, I would buy them.

Your task:

Out loud to yourself in the car or in the comments below, tell me who your favorite fashion designer/brand is!

Resources mentioned:

Claudia Cardinale interview

8 ½ by Fellini

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP_54.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 10:15pm PDT

[Podcast 53] Mini-story: How can you talk about your favorite things? Pt. 3

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Translation:

La moda è una delle mie cose preferite.
Fashion is one of my favorite things.
Leggo spesso il blog The Blonde Salad scritto da Chiara Ferragni.
I often read the blog, The Blonde Salad, written by Chiara Ferragni.
Chiara Ferragni è italiana, di Cremona, al Nord Italia.
Chiara Ferragni is an Italian from Cremona in the North of Italy.
Sul suo blog, parla di firme come Alexander McQueen, Chanel, Dolce & Gabbana, e Giuseppe Zanotti.
On her blog, she talks about brands like Alexander McQueen, Chanel, Dolce + Gabbana e Giuseppe Zanotti.
Non voglio comprare vestiti, ma mi piace la moda. Secondo me, la moda è una forma d'arte.
I don’t want to buy these clothes, but I appreciate the fashion. According to me, fashion is a type of art.
Ma forse se potessi permettermi quei vestiti, li comprei!
But maybe if I could buy these clothes, I would.
E quando leggo il blog di Chiara, sento sempre il desiderio di fare shopping. Che strano, eh?
And when I read Chiara’s blog, I always feel like going shopping. Weird, huh?
Adesso, il mio stilista preferito è YSL. Ma amo anche Brunello Cucinelli. Ha costruito un regno di cashmere e i suoi abiti sono semplici e eleganti.
Right now my favorite fashion designer is YSL. But I also love Brunello Cucinelli. He built a kingdom of cashmere and his clothes are simple and elegant.
Quando sono stata in Italia, sono andata a Solomeo, dove producono gli abiti di Brunello Cucinelli. La città era molto piccola e la gente era felice e simpatica.
When I was in Italy, I went to Solomeo, where they make Brunello Cucinelli clothes. The town was really small and the people were happy and nice.

La moda è una delle mie cose preferite.

La moda - fashion - is our main subject.

We use it just like in English and the difference is that we combine DI + LE for COSE to turn it into DELLE COSE, and the fancy name for that construction is preposizioni articolate.

Anyway, after that, the mie for my and preferite for favorite agrees with the plural feminine form of cose.

Agreement is so important in Italian. The only reason we engage in conflict here is when the noun is irregular like ‘IL PROBLEMA’ for problem or ‘LE RAGIONI’ for reasons.

Leggo spesso il blog The Blonde Salad scritto da Chiara Ferragni. - I read often instead of I often read. Scritto is the past tense form of scrivere - to write and we use FROM instead of OF here for the preposition, meaning we use DA instead of DI.

Chiara Ferragni è italiana, di Cremona, al Nord Italia. Use the verb ESSERE - to be for is Italian. We change the ending of Italian to be feminine. Di Cremona for the city and then AL nord Italia for the region.

Sul suo blog, parla di firme come Alexander McQueen, Chanel, Dolce & Gabbana, e Giuseppe Zanotti. - Sul - on -- just like English/parla just like English. Firme is used to mean brands.

Secondo me, la moda è una forma d'arte. - Secondo me means according to me. Naturally I would say it’s a type of art and go for the word tipo but it’s actually form here. This is one of those collocations. You would tend to see forma used with arte in everyday conversation.

Ma forse se potessi permettermi quei vestiti, li comprei! - Uses the imperfect subjunctive tense.

Adesso, il mio stilista preferito è YSL. *Notice how il mio stilista is irregular.

Ma amo anche Brunello Cucinelli. *Notice how anche is after the verb just like spesso is after leggo.

Ha costruito un regno di cashmere e i suoi abiti sono semplici e eleganti. - Costruire - to build/past tense

Use abiti here interchangeably with vestiti, but vestiti is used more informally and abiti is used more formally with people you don’t know.

Quando sono stata in Italia, sono andata a Solomeo, dove producono gli abiti di Brunello Cucinelli. La città era molto piccola e la gente era felice e simpatica. - Past tense is sono stata. In Italia because it’s a country. La città agrees with piccola and gente agrees with felice and simpatica.

Era is the imperfect tense.

Your task:

Listen to this super short episode again and see where you can make connections!

Resources mentioned:

Americans dining in Italy

Imperfect Tense

Past Tense

Imperfect Subjunctive Tense

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP_53.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 5:25pm PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

[Podcast 52] Mini-story: How can you talk about your favorite things? Pt. 2

Key phrase/vocabulary: Chiara Ferragni è italiana, di Cremona, al Nord Italia.

russo/russa

americano/americana

cinese

giapponese

*note the lack of capitalization

Non voglio comprare vestiti.

Great phrase for traveling and shopping → especially if you’re at the open air market.

Non voglio comprarlo. → I don’t want to buy it. Note that the ending will change according to what it is.

Non voglio comprarle - borse/purses

Non voglio comprarli - portafogli/wallets

Non voglio comprarla - borsa/purse

Non voglio comprarlo - portafoglio

Key collocation: sento sempre il desiderio di fare shopping

Great construction - sento sempre il desiderio di leggere un libro.

Mi sento is great, too! I feel → Mi sento soddisfatta/o. -- With food, with the day, with life!

Key grammar: Sul suo blog

Su - on - preposition

Suo - possessive

Blog is the same in English!

Secondo me, la moda è una forma d'arte.

According to me - Secondo me

Forma d’arte is a great collocation!

Notice how d’ connects with arte to mean of art.

It begins with an 'a' so it connects.

Your task:

Think of a writer of the blog that you often read. Then out loud to yourself or in the comments below this episode, tell me in Italian where the person is from who writes the blog.

Resources mentioned:

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP_52.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 11:11am PDT

Mini-Story: How can you talk about your favorite things? Pt. 1

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Transcript:

La moda è una delle mie cose preferite.

Leggo spesso il blog The Blonde Salad scritto da Chiara Ferragni.

Chiara Ferragni è italiana, di Cremona, al Nord Italia.

Sul suo blog, parla di firme come Alexander McQueen, Chanel, Dolce & Gabbana, e Giuseppe Zanotti.

Non voglio comprare vestiti, ma mi piace la moda. Secondo me, la moda è una forma d'arte.

Ma forse se potessi permettermi quei vestiti, li comprei!

E quando leggo il blog di Chiara, sento sempre il desiderio di fare shopping. Che strano, eh?

Adesso, il mio stilista preferito è YSL. Ma amo anche Brunello Cucinelli. Ha costruito un regno di cashmere e i suoi abiti sono semplici e eleganti.

Quando sono stata in Italia, sono andata a Solomeo, dove producono gli abiti di Brunello Cucinelli. La città era molto piccola e la gente era felice e simpatica.

Key phrase/vocabulary: Leggo spesso il blog

Molti runner tendono a correre più spesso su strade e marciapiedi.

Molto spesso - Time and time again, very often

Un po’ spesso - a bit thick

Non/Capita spesso di

p.es. Mi capita spesso di girare i mercati della città.

Key collocation: scritto da Chiara Ferragni

ben scritto - well-written

scritto a mano - handwritten

Italiano scritto - Written Italian

Italiano parlato - Spoken Italian

Key grammar: La moda è una delle mie cose preferite.

Fashion is one of my favorite things.

In Italian, you would think “Italian is one of my preferred things.”

With this construction you can change ‘la moda’ to whichever is one of your favorite things.

Like 'la musica' for music or 'fare shopping' for shopping

Your task:

Think of a blog that you read often. Then out loud to yourself or in the comments below this episode, tell me in Italian what blog you read often and who it’s written by.

Resources mentioned:

Spaghetti al nero di seppia - Pasta with squid ink

Anthony Bourdain Parts Unknown | Sicily

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP_51.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 11:02pm PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast orlisten to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Total honesty here, I tend to forget that I should be using the formal version of Italian with people that I should and sometimes I make people my age feel old when I accidentally use the formal on them.

One day though, I shall get it right.

And I look forward to that.

For now, I'm going to outline the differences between the formal and informal version of Italian so you have a leg up and hopefully never get them confused like me.

This isn't an exhaustive lesson though.

I'm just going to tell you exactly what you need to know to be conversational with informal and formal Italian.

So first.

Yes, there are two forms.

Formal is used for people like teachers, elders, strangers, and acquaintances.

So, it's like when I met an older gentleman last week and should've used 'Lei' instead of 'Tu', but alas, we can't win all of the time.

Informal is used with friends, family members, children and peers your age.

Here's the first thing that you need to know about the difference.

When you address people, you often use io, tu, lui, lei, noi, voi, e loro to say, respectively, I, you, he, she, we, you all, and they.

Io - I

Tu- You

*Used for the informal tense!

Lui/lei/Lei/egli: He/she

*Also the formal tense!

Noi: We

Voi: You all

Loro: They

So, when the gentlemen asked me, "Hai dormito bene?" - Did you sleep well?

I should've answered. "Si, e lei?" But I answered "Si, e tu?"

Shame. Shame.

Here's the 2nd thing.

Arrivederci - Good-bye (informal)

ArrivederLa - Good-bye (formal)

Here's the 3rd thing.

Di dove sei? - Where are you from? (informal)

Di dov'è Lei? - Where are you from? (formal)

Here's the 4th thing.

Come stai? - How are you? (informal)

Come sta? - How are you? (formal)

Here's the 5th thing & the overall rule.

This is a conjugation table for the verb 'essere'.

Conjugation table for verb essere

Whatever verb form is in the third row down, the lui/lei/Lei/egli row, that's the verb that you use for formal Italian.

Any verb form in the second row, the tu row, that's the verb form that you use for informal Italian.

That's it for now!

In the comments below, ask me any question that you have about informal and formal forms of Italian.

[photo credit: John Picken]

Resources mentioned:

The Florentine article

Direct download: ICE_EP_50.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 9:58pm PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Maybe it was just me, but when I learned the "would" tense in Italian (the present conditional), I felt like I could finally express myself in a more fluid and flexible way.

It was exciting.

I felt like the whole tense made me seem more competent in the language.

Learn it, put it to use, and let me know if you feel the same way.

Cominciamo! (Let's start.)

What is the "would" tense?

1.) The "would" tense expresses just that.

In English, we say "I would do this", "I would go there," "What would you like to eat?" It's the same here.

2.) If we're going by the book definition, it "expresses an intention, a preference, a wish, or a polite request." (1)

And how do you actually use it?

There are 4 guidelines for using this tense.

1.) Here are the major endings for the regular verbs.

-ei

-esti

-ebbe

-emmo

-este

-ebbero

2.) The endings for verbs ending in -ARE are as follows:

* Verbs that end in -are change to -ere when conjugated.
For example, parlare --> parlerei

Conjugating -are verbs in Italian for present conditional

Verbs ending in -EREare conjugated as follows:

Conjugating Italian verbs ending in -ere for the present conditional

Verbs ending in -IRE are conjugated as follows:

Conjugating verbs ending in -IRE in Italian in Present Conditional

3.) Here are the irregular verbs that you should be aware of:

Andare --> andrei, andresti, andrebbe, andremmo, andreste, andrebbero

Avere --> avrei, avresti, avrebbe, avremmo, avreste, avrebbero

Bere --> berrei, berresti, berrebbe, berremmo, berreste, berrebbero

Cadere --> cadrei, cadresti, cadrebbe, cadremmo, cadreste, cadrebbero

Dare --> darei, daresti, darebbe, daremmo, dareste, darebbero

Dovere --> dovrei, dovresti, dovrebbe, dovremmo, dovreste, dovrebbero

Essere --> sarei, saresti, sarebbe, saremmo, sareste, sarebbero

Fare --> farei, faresti, farebbe, faremmo, fareste, farebbero

Potere --> potrei, potresti, potrebbe, potremmo, potreste, potrebbero

Sapere --> saprei, sapresti, saprebbe, sapremmo, sapreste, saprebbero

Stare --> starei, staresti, starebbe, staremmo, stareste, starebbero

Vedere --> vedrei, vedresti, vedrebbe, vedremmo, vedreste, vedrebbero

Venire --> verrei, verresti, verrebbe, verremmo, verreste, verrebbero

Vivere --> vivrei, vivresti, vivrebbe, vivremmo, vivreste, vivrebbero

Volere --> vorrei, vorresti, vorrebbe, vorremmo, vorreste, vorrebbero

4.) Verbs ending -care and -gare have a change in spelling when conjugated.

Cercare --> cercherei, cercheresti, cercherebbe, cercheremmo, cerchereste, cercherebbero

*Adds a H between C and E

Pagare --> pagherei, pagheresti, pagherebbe, pagheremmo, paghereste, pagherebbero

*Adds a H between G and E

Not so bad, right?

Once you have the endings down and remember that you should change the ends of -are to -ere, you're basically golden and all you need is practice.

So let's get some while you're here.

Gli esempi (some examples):

1.) Vorrei un cappuccino - I would like a cappuccino.

*You'll use 'vorrei' a lot when ordering food or asking for things. It's much more polite than just saying 'Voglio' or I want.

2.) Compreremmo una Tesla. - We would buy a Tesla. (aka the best car on earth)

3.)Vivreste in Cina. - You all would live in China.

4.) Io al tuo posto cercherei un lavoro. - If I was in your place, I would look for a job.

If you're looking for some more practice,visit this site to do some exercises and talk to your language partner this week about this tense so you can practice it with them!

(1) Reference from page 300 of the Sixth Edition of Ciao! by Carla Larese Riga

Direct download: ICE_EP_49.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 12:34pm PDT

Indefinite Pronouns in Italian (or words that will help you be vague)

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

They're called indefinite for a reason.

Once they're used, you can't be sure what that person is speaking about exactly.

Which works marvelously if you want to say broad sweeping statements like "Oh yes. I know someone in Rome. We vacation together a lot."

Or "Everybody I know has some houses along the Southern French border."

On a more serious note, they're used to describe:

  • Some
  • Everybody
  • Someone
  • Anything
  • Something
  • Everyone
  • Everything
  • Any

You get the picture.

They're pretty easy to use in actual conversation, give or take a few tweaks, and once you put them in your Anki and study them for a couple of days, you'll be good to go.

Here are the most popular indefinite pronouns:

  • Dovunque (do/voon/qway) - Everywhere, anywhere (used more often in conversation)
  • Ovunque (oh/voon/qway) - Wherever, anywhere (seen more often in literature)
  • Chiunque (key/oon/qway) - Whomever
  • Qualunque (kwal/oon/qway)- Any, whatever, whichever
  • Ogni (own/yee) - Each
  • Qualche (qwale/kay)- Some
  • Ognuno (own/yoo/no)- Everyone, each one
  • Qualcuno(qwal/koo/no) - Someone, anyone
  • Alcuni/e(ahl/koo/knee)- Some
  • Qualcosa (qwal/ko/za) - Something
  • Tutti/e (two/tee-eh) - Everybody, all
  • Tutto (two/toe) - Everything

Here is how they're used in actual conversation

  • Ogni giorno - Every day
  • Qualcosa da bere - Something to drink
  • Qualcosa da mangiare - Something to eat
  • Poi, alcune persone mi hanno detto che gli uomini italiani fischiano alle donne e le infastidischono. - Then some people told me that Italian men whistle at the women and bother them.
  • Prima di arrivare, ho anche imparato qualche parola in italiano. - Before arriving, I learned some words in Italian.
  • Tutte le persone del sud Italia sono simpatiche. - All of the people in Southern Italy are nice.
  • E che tutti gli stereotipi sono sbagliati. - And that all of the stereotypes are wrong.
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Category:Italian -- posted at: 10:02am PDT