30 Minute Italian

Categories

Italian
general

Archives

2016
January

2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2014
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2013
December
November
October
September
August
July

October 2014
S M T W T F S
     
      1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31

Syndication

Italian Word Speed Dates: Bastare, Mancare and Piacere

When and how to use the Italian verbs bastare, mancare and piacere.

Direct download: ICE_EP145.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 8:14pm PDT

13 Expressions to Keep Conversation Flowing in Italian When You Forget a Word, a Phrase or a Conjugation

Expressions to use if you're not sure what to say during an Italian conversation.

Direct download: ICE_Ep144_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 11:18am PDT

[IN ITALIAN] In this quick clip, Carmine Caruso tells how Italians typically celebrate Christmas.

Direct download: Christmas_Episode_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 11:30am PDT

How to be enthusiastic in a more Italian way and grow your vocabulary with 15 ways to express your excitement in Italian.

Direct download: ICE_Ep142_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:37pm PDT

Once you visit southern Italy, you feel like you've seen an entirely different world while in the same country, which is what I imagine Cherrye Moore experienced upon moving to Calabria with her native Italian husband.

Cherrye's story, like many expats, is full of ups and downs with the language and the culture.

What I think is most special about our chat is her favorite parts of Italy, one of which makes you feel so at home even if you were never born there, which for many of us without any native Italian blood is one of the greatest gifts Italy has to give.

Direct download: Cherrye_Moore_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 10:28am PDT

The way you think about yourself as a language learner can get in the way of how well you learn the language. Here's how to put your doubts about yourself to sleep.

Direct download: ICE_Ep140_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 8:00am PDT

Learn how to say descriptions for hair color, eye color, height, weight, and nationality in Italian.

Direct download: ICE_EP139_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 10:22am PDT

How to Talk About Your Family in Italian

How to talk about your family in Italian so you can make small talk.

Direct download: ICE_EP138_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 10:54am PDT

Is pronunciation or grammar more important? (An interview with Emanuele Venditti)

An interview with Emanuele Venditti in which you'll learn why pronunciation is more imporant than grammar, three new sayings to use with friends and in stories and common mistakes made with the subjunctive tense. You'll also hear about his vision for an online platform with which you can learn and speak Italian with natives on a weekly basis.

Direct download: ICE_EP137_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 6:51pm PDT

What's it like to be an expat in Rome? (An Interview with Tiffany Parks)

Learn how Tiffany Parks ended up as an expat in Rome, Italy and how she used her love of opera to connect with the Italian language. You'll also learn her four methods for learning the language, two tips for avoiding dangerous situations in Italy and how she got the ball rolling on her move to a new country.

Direct download: Tiffany_Parks.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 3:02pm PDT

Learn the differences between the verbs "potere" and "riuscire" in Italian.

Direct download: ICE_EP135__.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 11:55am PDT

Imperative Mood in Italian (or how to be demanding and give advice in Italian)

Using the imperative in Italian to give a command, offer an invitation or suggest advice.

Direct download: ICE_EP134_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 5:36pm PDT

When to Use the Subjunctive Mood and When to Use the Present Indicative Tense

Using the present subjunctive mood to express doubts, wishes and uncertainties and using the the present indicative to express a certainty or fact in Italian.

Direct download: ICE_EP133_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 1:54pm PDT

Some motivation for those days that you just don't feel like learning a new grammar tense or vocabulary words. Forza!

Direct download: ICE_EP132_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 2:34pm PDT

Learn some words in Italian that come from English, like nerd, cupcake, and whiskey.

Direct download: ICE_EP131_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 9:16am PDT

What is it like to be an expat in Florence? (An Interview with Alexandra Lawrence)

Alexandra Lawrence tells you exactly what it takes to make it as an expat while learning the culture through the language.

Direct download: ICE_Ep30_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 9:12pm PDT

Here are twelve phrases in Italian that are typically used with the subjunctive mood to express thoughts, opinions, desires, fear, etc.

Direct download: ICE_EP128_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Learn how to write a birthday card in Italian to a friend, your significant other, family, or on Twitter.

Direct download: ICE_Ep127_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 11:21am PDT

Learn how Linda and Steve started The Beehive Hotel/Hostel in Rome, Italy.

Direct download: ICE_EP126_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 12:21pm PDT

Learn the various ways you can use the words "ne" and "ci" in Italian.

Direct download: ICE_Ep_125.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 1:26pm PDT

Learn how to tell a story in Italian with twenty phrases.

Direct download: ICE_EP124.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 11:22pm PDT

Learn how and why Toni DeBella, from Orvieto or Bust, moved to Orvieto, Italy and her experiences as an American expat.

Direct download: ICE_EP123_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Learn three verbs that every beginner should master in Italian in the past tense, present tense, subjunctive tense, and future tense.

Direct download: ICE_Ep122_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 9:00am PDT

Learn when to use niente and/or nulla in Italian.

Direct download: ICE_Ep121_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 11:50am PDT

Sentence structure is incredibly important to sounding natural in Italian. Here is how you structure basic sentences in Italian.

Direct download: ICE_Ep120.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Here are twelve phrases in Italian that are typically used with the subjunctive mood to express thoughts, opinions, desires, fear, etc.

Direct download: ICE_Ep119_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Learn how to use the words appena, addirittura, comunque and quindi in Italian.

Direct download: ICE_Ep117_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

See examples of what it means when a verb is regular or irregular in Italian and how -are, -ire, and -ere verbs are conjugated in Italian in the present tense.

Direct download: ICE_Ep115.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Learn how to use relative and absolute superlatives in the Italian language along with examples.

Direct download: ICE_EP113.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Learn a few of the methods Luca has used to learn twelve languages on his own along with how to hone your Italian accent.

Direct download: ICE_Ep112_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Learn how to make your verbs, adjectives, and objects agree in Italian between masculine/feminine and singular/plural with examples.

Direct download: ICE_EP111_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 6:00am PDT

Meet Rosangela, a native Italian speaker, who draws to help other learn Italian vocabulary and phrases. This interview is entirely in Italian and transcripts can be found in the show notes.

Direct download: ICE_Ep110_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 8:00am PDT

Learn about what the Veneto region was like while Monica Cesarato grew up, how it is now, and the beautiful (& sometimes scary) history it has.

Direct download: ICE_Ep109_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 8:00am PDT

Learn why you keep making mistakes with prepositions in Italian and how you can make less mistakes in the future.

Direct download: ICE_Ep108.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 9:44am PDT

Learn where a native Italian from the south of Italy suggests you should visit, what you should definitely eat, and her favorite idiomatic words and phrases.

Direct download: ICE_Ep107_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 10:16am PDT

Learn what you can do to practice your Italian while you're traveling to Italy as an Italian language learner.

Direct download: ICE_EP106_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 10:47am PDT

If you've hit a wall with Italian, you'll love this episode. Learn why your Italian doesn't sound like a natural or native Italian and how you can work on sounding more native.

Direct download: ICE_Ep105_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 10:13am PDT

Learn how to understand and use the words tale, eccome and semmai in Italian.

Direct download: ICE_Ep104_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 8:38am PDT

Learn how to improve your pronunciation in Italian as well as memorize hundreds of vocabulary words within 4-6 months.

Direct download: ICE_Ep103_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 1:59am PDT

Learn how to use the gerund tense in Italian or the tense that talks about what is happening in the moment.

Direct download: ICE_Ep102_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 9:33am PDT

Learn how to understand and use the words anzi, dunque and piuttosto in Italian.

Direct download: ICE_EP101.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 10:06am PDT

Learn 23 mantras for increasing your motivation to study Italian, nine small fixes for studying Italian more and how to use these mantras every single day.

Direct download: ICE_EP100_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 12:40pm PDT

In this episode, I chat with Gail Mencini, author of the fictional novel To Tuscany with Love, about experiencing an authentic Italy and telling your story.

Direct download: ICE_Ep98.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 9:54am PDT

Learn how to form and use articulated prepositions in Italian. (al, sul, nell', dall', etc.)

Direct download: ICE_Ep97.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 12:38pm PDT

Learn about authentic Italian cooking, learning Italian and raising an organic garden in Tuscany, Italy with Simonetta and Paola from Toscana Mia.

You'll learn:

  • Which one mistake most Americans make when cooking pasta
  • How they are able to grow organic vegetables (and some tips for dealing with pests that include beer)
  • One simple pasta recipe that you can make today
  • How to know what good olive oil really is and how much it should cost
  • How to find good olive oil in America
  • How Italians learn Italian growing up
  • Two tips for foreigners learning Italian that makes grammar much more interesting
  • How you can attend one of their cooking or language classes
Direct download: ICE_Ep96.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 12:02pm PDT

Simple Prepositions in Italian {or why the smallest words hurt the most}

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

All on their own, prepositions can be a pain in the butt.

This is especially when you're at an upper intermediate level, and you think you're getting the hang of Italian and THE ONLY THING THAT KEEPS MESSING YOU UP IS PREPOSITIONS.

{No personal experience or anything. No. I'm not yelling.}

COMUNQUE. There are two main kinds of prepositions - simple prepositions and articulated prepositions.

Not sure what comunque means? Read this article: Italian Speed Dates - Appena, Addirittura, Comunque and Quindi

Simple prepositions look like this:

  • di - of, from, about, by, than
  • a - to,at,in
  • da - from,by
  • in - in, at
  • con - with
  • su - on/over/above/about
  • per - for/in order to/because
  • tra - between/among
  • fra - between/among

The fact that they exist is pretty easy to understand. I mean, here are some of the situations when you use each one.

*The examples in English below are used in "Italian-speak" or what English would sound like if translated directly from Italian to English. This is to help you turn off that inner translator constantly working in your head. Once this happens, you can start focusing on creating natural sounding Italian sentences.

di - of, about, from, by, than

  • To show possession of an object {This is the purse OF Giulia - Questa è la borsa di Giulia.}
  • To show where someone is from {Giulia is OF Verona. - Giulia è di Verona.}
  • To express who/what someone is talking about {She was talking OF Giuseppe. - Parlava di Giuseppe}
  • To talk about age {I have a son OF thirteen years. - Ho un figlio di tredici anni.}
  • To describe an object/person {It's a coin OF gold. - È una moneta d'oro.}

a - to,at,in

  • To talk about a location {IN Verona, AT home - a Verona, a casa}
  • To talk about how someone is thinking of another {I am thinking TO him. - Penso a lui.}
  • To talk about a certain time {I am meeting her AT noon. - La vedo a mezzogiorno.}
  • To describe movement {She went there IN foot. - È andata a piedi. }

da - from,by

  • To talk about a distance that was taken, like a trip {Maria left FROM Rome yesterday. - Maria è partita da Roma ieri.}
  • To talk about taking something from something {She took her wallet FROM her purse. - Ha tolto il portafoglio dalla borsa.}
  • To talk about a time period that's passed {From years (ago) - Da anni}

CPF: You can also use "Da" to talk about someone's home. So if you wanted to say Lucia's house, you would say "Da Lucia."

in - in, at

  • To talk about location in a larger area, like a state or country {She lives IN California, He lives IN Germany - Lei abita in California, Lui abita in Germania}
  • To talk about a place where someone is going {I'm going IN the library - Vado in biblioteca.}
  • To talk about a type of transportation {You're going IN train? - Vai in treno?}

con - with

  • To talk about being with someone {I am WITH my grandma. - Sono con mia nonna.}
  • To talk about a combination of things {I am eating pizza WITH the pumpkin. - Mangio la pizza con i fiori di zucca.}
  • To describe a person's behavior {He is very nice WITH me. - Lui è molto gentile con me.}

su - on/over/above/about

  • To talk about a topic: {I am reading a book on Italian History - Sto leggendo un libro SULLA storia italiana}
  • To talk about a location {He is ON the roof. - Lui è sul tetto.}

per - for/in order to/because

  • To talk about a length of time (a period of time that's now over. Otherwise you would use DA. {I've been reading this book FOR two days. - Sto leggendo questo libro DA due giorni.}
  • Example with PER: {I have lived in Italy for 2 years [meaning you are not there anymore]} = Ho vissuto in Italia PER due anni.
  • or: {I have been living in Italy for 2 years [meaning you are still living there} = Vivo in Italia DA due anni.
  • To talk about a reason/purpose {I'm going to school FOR my parents. - Vado a scuola per i miei.}
  • To talk about going somewhere {I want to leave for England/my holidays. - Mi piacerebbe partire per l'Inghilterra/per le vacanze.}
  • To talk about price {I bought a kilo of oranges FOR three euro. - Ho comprato un chilo di arance PER tre euro.}

tra - between/among
fra - between/among

  • To talk about a time period {I finish school BETWEEN a year. - Finisco la scuola fra un anno.}
  • To talk about a comparison {AMONG everyone, Theresa is the nicest. - Fra tutti, la più simpatica è Theresa.}
  • To talk about a location {Walk BETWEEN the trees. - Passeggiare tra gli alberi.}

Writing that was a little bit painful, which is amazing because I love grammar.

It was painful because there are still so many other usages that I left out for the sake of simplicity.

Understanding the basics first is a must, and I'll be sure to write some more article about the nuances and the fun {read: not fun} exceptions with prepositions.

Want to finally be conversational in Italian? Download Mango Languages for Italian.

MangoLogo_CherHaleWant to keep your language learning going? Check out Mango Languages' downloadable language-learning software, and mobile apps, too!

Mango's conversational approach will get you talking ASAP. That's the most fun part, right?

Download Mango's program on up to five computers and use it on the go with your smartphone or tablet. And the best part? It costs less than a few tanks of gas.

Go to icebergproject.co/italianmango to get 20% off as a special discount to members of The Iceberg Project community.

Any questions for now? Drop ‘em in the comments below.

Direct download: ICE_Episode_95.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 12:00am PDT

Learn how to research your Italian ancestry and genealogy with Mary Tedesco from Origins Italy.

Direct download: ICE_Ep99_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 6:00pm PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Trisha Thomas has been living and working in Italy for twenty years, but more than that, she has raised her entire family in Italy.

What it Means to Be an Italian Mamma and Build a Career in Italy with Trisha Thomas

This means that she's had a unique experience of growing up in America and raising Italian children, which has been a wonder and a challenge according to her.

Listen in to hear all about her adventures with being a mamma and how she's navigated the cultural landscape.

You'll learn:

  • What it means to be an Italian super mamma
  • Why formal vs informal language has given her so much trouble (and what she does about it)
  • Which two questions you need to learn in Italian when striking up small talk with Italians
  • How she got to Italy in the first place
  • How she felt when she first arrived in Italy since she didn't know the history, culture or the language
  • The differences in parenting styles between her Italian husband and her American beliefs
  • Which methods she found did not work with learning Italian (you'll love the one about grammar)
  • How she learned the Roman accent…on accident
  • What it's like to work with Italians on a daily basis (especially as the only American in the office)

My favorite articles from Mozzarella Mamma

Resources Mentioned

Get to know Trisha

Have an extra ten seconds? Say hi to Trisha on Twitter by pressing the click to tweet below!

Grazie @mozzarellamamma for giving great insight on living/working/raising kids in Italy! @icebergproject

Want to finally be conversational in Italian? Download Mango Languages for Italian.

MangoLogo_CherHaleWant to keep your language learning going? Check out Mango Languages' downloadable language-learning software, and mobile apps, too!

Mango's conversational approach will get you talking ASAP. That's the most fun part, right?

Download Mango's program on up to five computers and use it on the go with your smartphone or tablet. And the best part? It costs less than a few tanks of gas.

Go to icebergproject.co/italianmango to get 20% off and get started.

Direct download: ICE__Ep94.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 11:28am PDT

If you're interested in renting an apartment in Italy, it's likely that you'll have a more authentic experience.

You might be thinking that you need to stay 1-3 months in order to justify renting an apartment, but I've heard of people renting out apartments for one night, one week, or two weeks.

How to Rent an Apartment in Italy & a Sample Email in Italian for Booking Accommodation

The availability does depend on the season, so if you're going to Italy during the tourist season during the summer, it isn't as likely that you'll be able to book an apartment for one night or one week.

Want to get a free e-mail script for how to book inquire about an apartment/hotel in Italian? Find out how to at the end of this article.

The price all depends on everything that would go into account if you were looking for an apartment to rent at home. How many people are staying with you, what amenities do you expect, and what area of the city do you prefer?

Vocabulary for Renting an Apartment

affittasi appartamento

ah-fee-TAH-zee ah-par-tah-MEN-toe

apartment for rent

ammobiliato

ah-mo-bee-lee-AH-toe

furnished

i servizi disponibili in casa

ee sehr-VEE-zee dee-spo-NEE-bee-lee een kah-zah

home amenities

My editor Maria suggests that we all visit Santa Maria Capua Vetere, a town near Naples, where you'll find the famous Spartacus Arena. She says it's magic. I don't know about you, but describing anything as magical is enough to get me there.

Here is a list of the most popular rental sites for booking apartments in Italy.

Because I haven't had a ton of experience booking apartments in Italy, I consulted Reid's Italy and have summarized a list of the most important facts about renting.

  • Reserve in advance from 7 months to 1 year.
  • Each apartment rental will require a deposit that is between 30-50% of the total price.
  • Ask about all extra fees.
  • Remember to bring toiletries that a hotel would usually provide, like soap, shampoo, and conditioner.
  • The tourist season is approximately between April 20 - October and during the Christmas season.

It's also important to have cash when you pay for your rent on the apartment.

Want a free e-mail script for inquiring about a hotel or an apartment?

Here's what you can do.

1.) Click the button below and tell people on Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus that you got this cool script.

2.) Click which social media site you'd like to post to.

3.) Post to it.

4.) Click the "Done! Gain access now!" button.

Want to finally be conversational in Italian? Find Mango Languages at your library.

MangoLogo_CherHaleMango's online and mobile language-learning programs are available for free through thousands of libraries. That means free access to Italian courses online and on your phone or tablet.

Mango's conversational approach will get you talking ASAP. That's the most fun part, right?

It's not just Italian though! You can learn over 60 languages (including English as a second language). You can even learn while watching foreign language films like the Italian films “Days and Clouds” and “Corpo Celeste.

Visit icebergproject.co/mango and type in your zip code to see if your library offers Mango Languages.

If not, let your librarian know you'd love to learn with Mango Languages.

In the comments below, ask me a question or leave some helpful advice that you learned from your experiences renting an apartment in Italy!

Direct download: ICE_EP93.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 6:26pm PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

How Lisa Chiodo and Her Family Followed Their Dream and Renovated a Farmhouse in Italy

Lisa and her husband began their journey by wanting to renovate an entire Italian village.

While that hasn't happened yet (and isn't one of their big goals anymore), they have managed to renovate a farmhouse or two in Italy.

When you listen to Lisa talk about the small village (max five families) where her family lives, it's such a dream and will make you want to book a trip there right now.

Especially if you love organic vegetables and a simpler pace of life.

You'll learn:

  • How Lisa and her husband got started with renovations
  • How they have managed to raise their children between Australia and Italy
  • Why they left Italy in the first place and how they managed to return
  • How her children have adapted to the Italian language after just one year
  • Three methods Lisa is using to learn Italian
  • Three Italian words/phrases that Lisa loves hearing and saying
  • A glimpse into the daily life of Lisa and her family

My favorite articles from Renovating Italy

Resources Mentioned

Lisa Chiodo and Husband

Get to know Lisa

kids-and-lisa

Have an extra ten seconds? Say hi to Lisa on Twitter by pressing the click to tweet below!

Such an inspiring episode w/ @RenovatingItaly & @icebergproject about following your dream & renovating a farmhouse in Italy

Lisa Chiodo Picture

Want ridiculously helpful support when learning Italian? Use Italki.

Italki LogoItalki is an online community of language learners and teachers to help you take whatever foreign language you're learning to the next level.

What's cool about it is that you can learn directly from home via Skype on your own schedule and skip the traditional school curriculum – which I love because I've always been a rebel.

It's totally affordable, too. I spend $10 with my tutor Giulia – a native speaker - for each 45-minute session, and the lessons are based on what I want to learn, which helps me retain information because I'm genuinely interested.

This style also encourages me to take note of the areas I need to strengthen throughout the week when I watch Italian movies, read books or newspapers, and talk to friends from Italy.

Signing up with Italki is completely free, and you can use the site to find language partners for free until you feel ready to hire an informal or professional teacher.

Go to icebergproject.co/Italki and start tackling those problem areas you've been dealing with alone, like those pesky prepositions, the endlessly confusing sentence structure, and that subjunctive tense that's been driving you crazy.

Visit icebergproject.co/italki now and sign up for a free account.

Direct download: ICE_EP91.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 10:13am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

[089] Riding in Small, Orange, Tattooed Cars in Italy Pt. 4

Vocabulary Speed-Dates

i carabinieri, ci hanno superati, abbiamo fermato, chiusa, delusa, perciò, mi sono addormentata, ancora

  • i carabinieri - the police {These are the officers that are a part of the army}
  • ci hanno superati {from the verb superare - to pass} they passed us
  • abbiamo fermato {from the verb fermare - to stop} we stopped
  • chiusa {usually chiuso} - closed
  • delusa - {usually deluso} disappointed
  • perciò - therefore
  • mi sono addormentata {from the verb addormentarsi} - to put oneself to sleep
  • ancora - still

Key phrases

per paura, per farli passare

  • Per paura - because of fear, for fear
  • Per farli passare - In order to let them pass

Grammar Bombs

You heard one in this sentence: Poi i carabinieri ci hanno superati e, per paura, abbiamo fermato la macchina per farli passare.

  • “Ci hanno superati” - They passed us.
  • “Ci” means “us.”
  • “Hanno superati” means “they passed.”
  • The “us” part of the sentence often goes before the verb and that's a really common way to structure Italian sentences.

In this case, it's an indirect object pronoun, and these types of sentences answer the question 'to what?' or 'to whom'

So in this case if you ask “to whom?” You would answer “to us.”

  • mi - me
  • ti - you
  • gli - him
  • le - her
  • ci - us
  • vi - you all
  • gli or loro - they (gli is used far more often, but loro is grammatically correct. With loro, you have to put it after the conjugated verb)

Your task

Create a couple of sentences on your own using indirect object pronouns.

Like - My told me that I am pretty or They told us to go to the store.

The word for pretty is simply “bella” and for store is “negozio.”

Resources mentioned

The Grand Difference Between Indirect and Object Pronouns (& yes you have to know them)

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Click to tweet: Just went on Italian vocab speed-dates w/ chiusa, delusa and ancora #italianmakesmesmile

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP90_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 8:00am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

[089] Riding in Small, Orange, Tattooed Cars in Italy Pt. 4

Vocabulary Speed-Dates

eravamo stipati, le sardine, piccola, macchina, arancione, le cinture di sicurezza

  • eravamo stipati {from the verb stipare - to cram/overcrowd} - We were were crammed
  • Le sardine - sardines
  • Piccola - small
  • Macchina - car
  • Le cinture di sicurezza - seatbelts
  • arancione - orange

Key phrases

eravamo quattro, una pizzeria aperta, visto che avevamo fame, siamo andati via dalla cantina

  • Eravamo quattro - Essere + # to talk about number of people
  • Una pizzeria aperta - an open pizzeria
  • Visto che avevamo fame - Visto che + verb = Since, seeing that we were hungry
  • Siamo andati via da + - We went away from

Grammar Bombs

I want to point out a piece of grammar that is often confusing for many language learners and that's indirect and direct object pronouns.

You heard one in this sentence: Ci hanno detto che c'era una pizzeria aperta e, visto che avevamo fame, siamo andate con loro.

“Ci hanno detto” - They told us.

“Ci” means “us.”

“Hanno detto” means “they told.”

The “us” part of the sentence often goes before the verb and that's a really common way to structure Italian sentences.

In this case, it's an indirect object pronoun, and these types of sentences answer the question 'to what?'; or 'to whom?'/p>

So in this case if you ask “to whom?” You would answer “to us.”

  • mi - me
  • ti - you
  • gli - him
  • le - her
  • ci - us
  • vi - you all
  • gli or loro - they (gli is used far more often, but loro is grammatically correct. With loro, you have to put it after the conjugated verb)

Indirect object pronouns are used for verbs that have to do with giving.

These are verbs like: to give (dare), to offer (offrire), to send(mandare), to deliver (portare), to gift (regalare), to return (restituire), to lend, and to loan (prestare).

Your task

See if you can remember the list of indirect object pronouns.

Resources mentioned

The Colors in Italian (or how to talk about her bright red lips and his skintight white shirt)

The Grand Difference Between Indirect and Object Pronouns (& yes you have to know them)

Ten Ways to Laugh in Italian - from Mirella at Parlatè

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Click to tweet: Just went on Italian vocab speed-dates w/ le sardine, stipare and arancione. #italianmakesmehappy

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP89__.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

[088] Riding in Small, Orange, Tattooed Cars in Italy Pt. 3

TRANSLATION

C'erano due ragazzi che si chiamavano Alessio e Riccardo.

There were two guys named Alessio and Riccardo.

Ma io e le mie amiche avevamo dato loro un soprannome: i bambini.

But me and my friends had given them a nickname: the kids.

Perché avevano diciassette anni ma sembravano più grandi.

Because they were 17 years old but they acted older.

Ogni sera, bevevano e fumavano. E avevano tatuaggi.

Each night, they drank and they smoked. And they had tattoos.

Ma era solo per ridere perché gli adolescenti in Italia e negli stati uniti sono sempre così.

But this was only as a joke because all teenagers in Italy and the United States are always like this.

A Viterbo, in Italia, c'era un posto chiamato 'La Cantina' dove ogni martedì andavamo a ballare.

In Viterbo, In Italy, there was a place called 'The Cantina' where each Tuesday we went to dance.

I bambini erano sempre lì.

The kids were always there.

Dopo un po', abbiamo fatto amicizia con loro.

After a little bit, we became friends with them.

Una notte in particolare, siamo andati via dalla Cantina con i bambini. Avevano una piccola macchina arancione con due cinture di sicurezza.

One night in particular, we left the Cantina with the kids. They had a small, orange car with two seatbelts.

Ma eravamo quattro. Eravamo stipati come sardine.

There were four of us. We were smushed like sardines.

Ci hanno detto che c'era una pizzeria aperta e, visto che avevamo fame, siamo andate con loro.

They told us that there was an open pizzeria e since we were hungry we went with them.

Abbiamo ascoltato un po' di musica italiana come Entics, e ho sentito la canzone 'Quanto 6 Bella' per la prima volta.

We listened to a bit of Italian music like Entics, and I heard the song “Quanto sei bella” for the first time.

Poi i carabinieri ci hanno superati e, per paura, abbiamo fermato la macchina per farli passare.

Then the police passed by us and because we were scared we stop the car and let them pass.

Quando siamo arrivati, la pizzeria era chiusa e rimasi delusa.

When we arrived, the pizzeria was closed and I was disappointed.

Perciò sono andata a casa e mi sono addormentata anche se avevo ancora fame.

So I went home and and went to sleep even though I was still hungry.

Your task

Listen to the original story in Italian and see how much of the story you can understand after hearing it in English.

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Click to tweet:Just finished listening to the translation of a mini-story by @icebergproject about tiny, tattooed, orange Italian cars!

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP88.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

[087] Riding in Small, Orange, Tattooed Cars in Italy Pt. 2

Vocabulary Speed-Dates

bevevano, fumavano, gli adolescenti, un posto, lì

  • bevevano - {from the verb bere - to drink} they drank
  • fumavano - { from the verb fumare - to smoke} they smoked
  • gli adolescenti - adolescents
  • un posto - a place
  • - there
  • - there

Key phrases

ogni sera, solo per ridere, avevano tatuaggi, andavamo a ballare, dopo un po', abbiamo fatto amicizia con loro

  • Ogni sera - each night
  • Ogni martedì - each Tuesday
  • solo per ridere - only for a laugh
  • avevano tatuaggi - avere tatuaggi - to have tattoos
  • andavamo a ballare - andare a ballare - to go to dance
  • dopo un po' - after a while
  • abbiamo fatto amicizia con loro - fare amicizia con qualcuno - to make friends with someone

Grammar Bombs

andavamo a ballare, a Viterbo, in Italia, fare amicizia con loro

Here are the sentences that the verbs came from:

  • Ogni sera, bevevano e fumavano. E avevano tatuaggi.
  • Ma era solo per ridere perché gli adolescenti in Italia e negli stati uniti sono sempre così.
  • A Viterbo, in Italia, c'era un posto chiamato 'La Cantina' dove ogni martedì andavamo a ballare.
  • I bambini erano sempre lì.
  • Dopo un po' abbiamo fatto amicizia con loro.

We have a couple of verbs that take certain prepositions and then we have two location prepositions.

A Viterbo - It's a city, so we use “a.” If it's a city, a small island, or a town, you use “a.”

In Italian - It's a country, so we use “in.” If it's a country, a state, a big island, or a region, you use in

Your task

Practice your prepositions with locations!

Tell yourself where you live and where you want to go in the world using what you learned.

Resources mentioned

When to Use the Prepositions “a,” “in,” and “da”

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Click to tweet: Just went on Italian vocab speed-dates w/ fumavano, bevevano, gli adolescenti e un posto.

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP87.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Vocabulary Speed-Dates

ragazzi, chiamavano, amiche, dato, soprannome, sembravano, più grandi

  • ragazzi - guys
  • chiamavano - {from the verb chiamare} - to call
  • amiche - {from amico - feminine plural) - friends
  • dato - {from dare - to give} - gave
  • soprannome - nickname
  • sembravano {from the verb sembrare - to seem} seemed
  • Più grandi - older

Key phrases

c'erano, avere diciassette anni

  • C'erano - there was
  • C'ègrave; - There is
  • Ci sono - There are
  • C'era - There was
  • Avere diciassette anni - to be seventeen years old
  • Avere + age + anni
  • Sui + vent'anni - Around 21 years old

Grammar Bombs

Cerano, si chiamavano, avevamo dato, avevano, sembravano

Here are the sentences that the verbs came from:

  • C'erano due ragazzi che si chiamavano Alessio e Riccardo.
  • Ma io e le mie amiche avevamo dato loro un soprannome: i bambini.
  • Perché avevano diciassette anni ma sembravano più grandi.

As you might notice, these verbs are in two tenses: the imperfect tense and the preterite perfect tense.

Now these are slightly complicated tenses.

The imperfect is a past tense that is used to describe something that happened in the past that was an action that happened again and again or used to describe things like the weather or emotions in the past.

In daily conversation, Italian language learners often confuse it with the regular past tense, or the passato prossimo, as they say in Italian.

The preterite perfect tense, known as the trapassato prossimo in Italian, describes an action that happened in the past like “He had already gone to the movies,” or “She had already gotten her hair cut.”

It uses “had + past tense of the verb.”

In Italian, they use the verb “imperfect tense of avere or essere” + “the past tense of the main verb.”

In this case: “Avevamo dato.”

Ma io e le mie amiche avevamo dato loro un soprannome: i bambini. - But me and my friends had given them a nickname: the kids.

Your task

If you're at a beginning level, say your age and the ages of your immediate family members in Italian.

If you're a higher level in italian, retell a quick story to yourself of something that happened in the past using the imperfect tense.

Resources mentioned

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Click to tweet: Just went on Italian vocab speed-dates w/ soprannome, ragazzi, dato e sembravano. #amolitaliano

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

 

Direct download: ICE_EP_086.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 11:59am PDT

Like pithy sayings and puns, colors add a bit of pop to language.
I mean, how can you tell a proper story in Italian about that beautiful human being you spent all night with without describing what they were wearing, how they looked, and the color of the wine you drank.

The Colors in Italian (or how to talk about her bright red lips + his skintight white t-shirt)

Here are the colors in Italian

  • Red - rosso
  • Pink - rosa
  • Orange - arancione
  • Yellow - giallo
  • Green - verde
  • Blue - azzurro

CPF: The Italian translation for “Prince Charming” is “Il Principe Azzurro.”

  • Purple - viola, porpora {has more red in it}
  • Silver - argento
  • Gray - grigio
  • Gold - oro
  • Black - nero
  • Brown - marrone
  • White - bianco

If you want to talk about dark shades, you can just add the word 'scuro' at the end of each color.

  • Dark red - rosso scuro
  • Dark green - verde scuro

CPF: Blu on its own is usually understood as dark blue.

If you want to look at lighter shades, here are some examples:

  • Baby blue - celeste
  • Baby pink - rosa confetto

If you want to talk about light shades, you can just add the word 'chiaro' at the end of each color.

  • verde chiaro - light green

CPF: Azzurro on its own is usually understood as light blue.

Some slightly exotic precise descriptions of colors

  • Blood red - rosso sangue
  • Fire red - rosso fuoco
  • Hot pink - rosa shocking
  • Salmon pink - rosa salmone
  • Blue green - verdeazzurro
  • Emerald green - verde smeraldo
  • Forest green - verde bosco
  • Jade green - verde acqua
  • Lilac - lilla
  • Periwinkle - pervinca
  • Violet - violetto
  • Red-orange - rosso arancio
  • Maroon - bordeaux
  • Shiny/glossy red - rosso lucido
  • Hazel brown - nocciola

CPF: That's the same word for a hazelnut! - Nocciola

In English, we pick + choose certain colors for certain characteristics, and Italian is no different.

Which colors should you use in which situations?

  • Red - rosso

If you hear the term “bollino rosso” on the news, it means that a situation is dangerous or difficult. Terms of the same category are “bollino verde” meaning safe and “bollino giallo” meaning everything is okay, but it could change.

  • Bollino rosso” could also refer to a television or movie rating. We would see it as PG-13 or R.
  • Bollino giallo” would be okay for kids but require adult supervision.
  • Bollino verde” is perfect for kids.

Pink - Unlike other colors, you don't have to change the ending of “rosa” to match the object it's describing.

IT NEVER CHANGES.

CPF: “Rosa” is also used to describe a book or a movie that's for “chicks,” what we call a “chick flick” or “chick lit.”

  • Other expressions:
  • Gossip column - cronaca rosa
  • Newborn baby girl - fiocco rosa

CPF: They say this because it's tradition that when a newborn baby girl is born, they hang a pink bow on the door.

  • Cool as a cucumber - fresco come una rosa
  • Orange - arancione
  • Yellow - giallo

CPF: “Un giallo” is also a mystery novel or thriller.

  • Green - verde

In English, you might hear someone say that they don't have any green, meaning money. In Italian, you would express that as “grana.” And if you're talking about marijuana, it's 'erba'

You can also make someone “green with envy.” The expression is “rendere {qualcuno} verde di invidia."

Blue - azzurro, blu

When describing someone's eyes, it's more common to use "gli occhi azzurri."

CPF: If you’re feeling blue, or sad, you would use “triste.”

  • Purple - viola
  • Silver - argento

CPF: If you want to express that someone was born with a silver spoon in one’s mouth, you wouldn’t use the word silver in Italian. The expression is “nato con la camicia” - {literally} born with the shirt on

  • Gold - oro

This can be used to describe the color and the actual object.

Some expressions:

  • Heart of gold - cuore d’oro
  • Not all that glitters is gold - Non è tutto oro quel che luccica
  • Sweet dreams - sogni d’oro
  • Eligible bachelor - scapolo d’oro
  • Black - nero

CPF: If you want to describe something as black-and-white with colors, you can use “in bianco e nero.” If you want to say that something is straightforward using the expressions black-and-white, you would use “chiaro e tondo/nero su bianco.”

If you want to talk about a dark room or a dark night, you would use the word "buio."

  • al buio - in the dark
  • buio pesto - pitch black

CPF: Just like in English, you can keep someone in the dark, or keep information from someone, as well in Italian. “Non me lo ha detto. Ne sono all'oscuro.” - “She didn’t tell me. I’m in the dark.”

  • Brown - marrone

You would use marrone to describe the color of someone’s eyes - gli occhi marroni.

You would use castano to describe the color of someone’s hair - i capelli castani.

You could also use the expression “black sheep” meaning “a misfit” with the term“pecora nera.”

A slew of exceptions

A brown bear doesn’t use either of the words above. It’s a word all on its own “orso bruno.”

Similarly:

  • Brown sugar - zucchero di canna
  • Brown rice - riso integrale
  • White - bianco

Want to finally be conversational in Italian? FindMango Languages at your library.

MangoLogo_CherHaleMango’s online and mobile language-learning programs are available for free through thousands of libraries. That means free access to Italian courses online and on your phone or tablet.

Mango’s conversational approach will get you talking ASAP. That’s the most fun part, right?

It's not just Italian though! You can learn over 60 languages (including English as a second language). You can even learn while watching foreign language films like the Italian films “Days and Clouds” and “Corpo Celeste.”

Visit icebergproject.co/mango and type in your zip code to see if your library offers Mango Languages.

If not, let your librarian know you’d love to learn with Mango Languages.

Questions? Drop ‘em in the comments below!

Direct download: ICE_EP_85.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 9:17am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Sarah Dowling, founder of Italy Project 365, is one of those people who knows what's good for her soul + follows that path as soon as she hears the call.

After finishing university, she needed more than just a blog to keep her connected to Italy and then decided to move to Bologna.

In this episode, we chat about how she got to that point, what logistics she went through to get there, and how she's managed learning the language throughout it all.

You'll learn:

  • Two Sicilian words she heard from her nonna growing up
  • Two of the best ways to search for an apartment in Italy
  • How to get your visa + teach English in Italy
  • Sarah's favorite Florentine poet + singer-songwriter from Bologna
  • Which language school she recommends in Bologna
  • Her three favorite Italian phrases + words
  • How she FINALLY learned the subjunctive {il congiuntivo}

My favorite articles from Italy Project 365

Resources Mentioned

Get to know me and Sarah

Site: http://italyproject365.com/

Twitter: @italyproject @icebergproject

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/italyproject365

Have an extra ten seconds? Say hi to Sarah on Twitter by pressing the click to tweet below!

Loved the interview btwn @italyproject & @icebergproject. Great tips on moving to Italy + learning Italian!

Direct download: ICE_Episode84.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 12:06am PDT

The second anything Italian comes up, you can already feel Sarah's passion emanate the space. While growing up with Italian roots might have contributed, she cultivated her love of Italy after her first trip to her father's hometown.

Since then she's taken herself on a beautiful journey replete with funny language mistake anecdotes and opportunities to interact with the culture, which she writes about on her blog Not Just Another "Dolce Vita."

You're going to love this episode because you'll learn:

  • Her advice on finally mastering Italian prepositions and sentence structure [She's an Italian professor. She knows her stuff.]
  • Which four methods she used to immerse herself in the language while still at home in Canada
  • How she navigated the Italian workplace and adapted to a Sienese accent
  • Seven of her favorite Italian musicians
  • Three of her favorite Italian words/phrases
  • Three recommendations for reading material at the beginner + upper intermediate level

Resources Mentioned:

My favorite articles from Not Just Another "Dolce Vita"

NJADV ButtonGet to know me and Sarah

Site: http://notjustanotherdolcevita.wordpress.com/

Twitter: @s_mastroianni @icebergproject

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NotJustAnotherDolceVita

Have an extra ten seconds? Say hi to me and Sara on Twitter by pressing the click to tweet below!

Just listened to the interview btwn @icebergproject & @s_mastroianni. Grazie for the brilliant #langlearning tips!

Direct download: ICE_Episode_83.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 11:24pm PDT

[#] How to Get Your Visa and Work Abroad in Italy with Rick ZulloRick Zullo escaped to Italy and simultaneously fell in love with the city of Rome and an Italian lady.

What's amazing about his site, RickZullo.com, is that he writes a mixture of Italian culture, language, and travel without sugarcoating it.

He's real, honest, and funny.

You're going to love this episode because you'll learn:

  • The exact process of how he got his one-year visa for Italy and other options for getting visas
  • How to teach English and work in Italy as a teacher
  • How he met his wife and dealt with some cultural translation barriers
  • Main methods for learning grammar [and why avoiding the passato remoto came back to bite him in the butt]
  • Which methods he didn't find particularly helpful
  • His experience working as a teacher in Rome [unique to the stories you usually hear]

Resources Mentioned:

My favorite articles from Rick Zullo

Get to know me and Rick

RZulloSite: http://rickzullo.com/

Twitter: RickZullo1 @icebergproject

Facebook: Ricks Rome

 

 

 

Have an extra ten seconds? Say hi to me and Rick on Twitter by pressing the click to tweet below!

Just listened to the interview btwn @icebergproject & @rickzullo1. Grazie for the brilliant #langlearning tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP82.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 5:00am PDT

Lisa Condie, founder of Better Way Italy and contributor to Huffington Post, picked up her entire life and moved to Florence Italy in June of 2012.

How Lisa Condie of Better Way Italy Listened to Her Intuition and Permanently Moved to Florence, ItalyIt's a dream that many of us imagine but never take action to accomplish, and Lisa is living proof that it's possible AND introduces a whole lotta' joy into your life, which is what we're all about at The Iceberg Project.

So it was my absolute pleasure to chat with her about all things Italian to get her perspective and hear her story, which I know will resonate with you.

You'll learn:

  • What ultimately made Lisa decide to move to Florence, Italy full time
  • The differences in how Italians and Americans conduct business
  • Lisa's favorite phrases in Italian that always make Italian smile
  • What she would do on days when she was really discouraged with Italian
  • Which pieces of the language that she still struggles with
  • Her three favorite things to do in her city of Florence, Italy
  • How she started her tours in Tuscany and what makes them unique out of a sea of Italian tour groups
  • How she manages to roll with the Italian lifestyle when things go wrong

My favorite articles from Better Way toDSC_4120 Italy

Connect with Me & Lisa

Website: http://betterwaytoitaly.com/

Twitter: @betterwayitaly @icebergproject

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/betterwaytoitaly

Have an extra ten seconds? Say hi to Lisa on Twitter by pressing the click to tweet below!

Just listened to the interview btwn @icebergproject & @betterwayitaly. Grazie for the amazing story + tips!

Want to finally be conversational in Italian? FindMango Languages at your library.

MangoLogo_CherHaleMango's online and mobile language-learning programs are available for free through thousands of libraries. That means free access to Italian courses online and on your phone or tablet.

Mango's conversational approach will get you talking ASAP. That's the most fun part, right?

It's not just Italian though! You can learn over 60 languages (including English as a second language). You can even learn while watching foreign language films like the Italian films “Days and Clouds” and “Corpo Celeste.”

Visit icebergproject.co/mango and type in your zip code to see if your library offers Mango Languages.

If not, let your librarian know you'd love to learn with Mango Languages.

 

Direct download: ICE_Ep81.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 4:02pm PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

[080] Due Ragazze Pazze: 29 Italian Phrases for Carnevale

Similar to our episode on Natale in December and our Valentine's Day episode in February we decided to do another themed podcast episode on doing Valentine's Day Italian style.

Listen: 32 Italian Valentine's Vocabulary and Pick-Up Phrases [Due Ragazze Pazze]

If you want to see the transcripts for our guest speakers Martina and Francesco, go to the bottom of this post where you'll find links to Melissa's site with the transcripts.

Italian Phrases for Carnevale

  • A Carnevale ogni scherzo adesso vale! - At Carnevale, anything goes!
  • Le maschere - The masks
  • I costumi di fantasia - Creative costumes
  • I coriandoli - Confetti
  • Fare gli scherzi - To play jokes
  • Prendere in giro qualcuno - To tease someone (Literally: To take someone for a spin)
  • I carri - floats
  • La carta pesta - Papier mache
  • Affascinante - Fascinating
  • I mascherari - Mask-makers
  • I personaggi dei cartoni animati - Cartoon characters
  • La trombetta - Little horn you blow into to make noise
  • I trucchi - Tricks
  • Il trucco - Make-up
  • I canali - Canals
  • Le gondole - Gondolas
  • Le manifestazioni - Big displays and street decorations
  • Costume d'epoca - Period costume
  • Le parrucche - Wigs
  • Allegria - Happiness
  • I festeggiamenti - Festivities
  • In buona compagnia - In good company
  • Tempo di spasso e di baldoria - Time to have fun
  • Chiacchiere - Crunchy, sweet streets served at Carnevale
  • Il travestimento collettivo - The collecting dressing up
  • Allestire - to prepare
  • Il concorso per la maschera più bella - Contest for the most beautiful mask
  • Riunioni di persone che si comportano o vestono in modo poco serio - gatherings of people who conduct themselves or dress in a frivolous way
  • Il volo dell'angelo - Flight of the angel

Want to learn more about the tradition called "The Flight of the Angel?" Read this: The 12 Marias of Carnevale & the Flight of the Angel

Cocktail Party Facts

  • The word Carnevale comes from "carne levare" since eating meat was restricted as a penance while preparing for Easter.
  • Carnevale has roots in the pagan celebrations of Saturnalia and Lupercalia.
  • Back in the 15th century, i mascherari - the Venetian mask-makers - enjoyed a special place in society. They even had their own laws and guild.
  • The snacks "Chiacchiere" are also known as intrigoni, cenci, bugie and frappe.
  • Il volo dell'angelo is a tradition that started when a Turkish acrobat walked on a rope from a boat tied in Riva degli Schiavoni to St. Marks Bell Tower and then from the tower to the Doge's Palace. It was a tribute to the Doge.
  • For Carnevale, kids usually dress up as their favorite cartoon characters.

Learn how to make le bugie from a native Italian: Le bugie di mamma Ada / Mamma Ada's little lies

Resources

Other Due Ragazze Pazze Episodes

Direct download: Due_Ragazze_Pazze_Carnevale_Episode.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 1:26pm PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Transcript for the story:

Sono una femminista.

Credo fermamente nell'uguaglianza e nella parità di diritti per tutti.

Ma intendiamoci: non ho intenzione di bruciare il reggiseno e ammetto che mi piacciono gli uomini.

Secondo me, nonostante ci sia una divergenza di opinioni su questo tema, molte persone capiscono la verità.

Alcuni mesi fa, ho letto di Antonio Gramsci, un italiano vissuto durante il fascismo e la dittatura di Mussolini.

Gramsci riteneva che tutte le persone fossero uguali e che l'indipendenza delle donne in particolare avrebbe portato a diversi miglioramenti sociali.

Ma, a causa delle sue convinzioni politiche, fu imprigionato dal regime fascista di Mussolini per lungo tempo.

Ammiro l'intelligenza di Antonio Gramsci e il suo impegno di attivista.

Nel film intitolato "Iron-Jawed Angels", la mia attrice preferita, Hilary Swank, recita la parte di Alice Paul, un'attivista del movimento di emancipazione femminile americano, che lottò in particolare per il diritto di voto delle donne.

(In italiano le femministe di inizio secolo, di cui Alice era leader in America, si chiamano "suffragette").
Ammiro le persone come Alice Paul e Antonio Gramsci che credono in un mondo migliore.

Vocabulary Speed Dates: le femministe, inizio secolo, suffragette, credere

  • le femministe - feminists

  • inizio secolo - start of the century

  • suffragette - suffragists

  • credere - to believe

Key phrases: un mondo migliore, di cui

  • un mondo migliore - a better world

  • di cui - of which

    • da cui - from which

    • in cui - wherein

    • tra cui - among which

    • la ragione per cui - the reason that

Grammar Bombs: era, si chiamano

  • Era - {verb: Essere} imperfect tense
  • Si chiamano - {verb: Chiamarsi} - To call oneself

Here we use the impersonal form and it's chiamano to agree with the subject of Alice Paul and Antonio Gramsci. So we conjugate chiamarsi, a reflexive verb, with the third person plural - or the "they" form.

Resources mentioned:

Present Tense Reflexive Verbs in Italian (or the verb tense that's all about you)

When to Use the Imperfect Tense and When to Use the Past Tense in Italian

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Click to tweet: Just went on Italian vocab speed dates w/ credere, suffragette, e le femministe. #whyisitaliansowesome @icebergproject

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_Ep79.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 2:10pm PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Transcript for the story:

Sono una femminista.

Credo fermamente nell'uguaglianza e nella parità di diritti per tutti.

Ma intendiamoci: non ho intenzione di bruciare il reggiseno e ammetto che mi piacciono gli uomini.

Secondo me, nonostante ci sia una divergenza di opinioni su questo tema, molte persone capiscono la verità.

Alcuni mesi fa, ho letto di Antonio Gramsci, un italiano vissuto durante il fascismo e la dittatura di Mussolini.

Gramsci riteneva che tutte le persone fossero uguali e che l'indipendenza delle donne in particolare avrebbe portato a diversi miglioramenti sociali.

Ma, a causa delle sue convinzioni politiche, fu imprigionato dal regime fascista di Mussolini per lungo tempo.

Ammiro l'intelligenza di Antonio Gramsci e il suo impegno di attivista.

Nel film intitolato "Iron-Jawed Angels", la mia attrice preferita, Hilary Swank, recita la parte di Alice Paul, un'attivista del movimento di emancipazione femminile americano, che lottò in particolare per il diritto di voto delle donne.

(In italiano le femministe di inizio secolo, di cui Alice era leader in America, si chiamano "suffragette").
Ammiro le persone come Alice Paul e Antonio Gramsci che credono in un mondo migliore.

Vocabulary Speed-Dates: le convinzioni politiche, ammiro, impegno, attivista, intitolato, recita

  • le convinzioni politiche - political beliefs

  • ammiro - {verb: ammirare - to admire} I admire

  • impegno - commitment, dedication

  • attivista - activist

  • intitolato - {verb: intitolare} - entitled

  • recita - {verb: recitare} - played a role

Key phrases: a causa di, la mia attrice preferita, il diritto di voto delle donne

  • a causa di - because of, due to

  • la mia attrice preferita - my favorite actress

    • I've gone over this before, but it's important to remember and it's great for small talk.

  • il diritto di voto delle donne - the right for women to vote

Grammar Bomb: delle sue convinzioni politiche, fu imprigionato, nel film

  • delle sue convinzioni politiche

  • fu imprigionato

    • fu comes from the passato remoto because it was a long time ago in history and imprigionato is the past tense of imprigionare - to imprison

  • nel film

    • preposizioni articolate - in + il = nel

Your task

Replace because of/due to in conversation today with 'a causa di'

Resources mentioned:

Simple Prepositions in Italian {or why the smallest words hurt the most}

Possessive Pronouns and Adjectives in Italian {or how to talk about what's yours}

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Click to tweet: Just went on Italian vocab speed dates w/ ammirare, impegno, & attivista @icebergproject

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP78.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 10:21am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

TRANSLATION

Sono una femminista.

I am a feminist.

Credo fermamente nell'uguaglianza e nella parità di diritti per tutti.

I believe firmly in equality and in equal rights for everyone.

Ma intendiamoci: non ho intenzione di bruciare il reggiseno e ammetto che mi piacciono gli uomini.

But let's get this straight. I have no intention of burning my bra and I do like guys.

Secondo me, nonostante ci sia una divergenza di opinioni su questo tema, molte persone capiscono la verità.

According to me, although there is disagreement on this topic, many people do understand the truth of Feminism.

Alcuni mesi fa, ho letto di Antonio Gramsci, un italiano vissuto durante il fascismo e la dittatura di Mussolini.

Some months ago, I read about Antonio Gramsci, an Italian who lived during the fascist regime and the dictatorship of Mussolini.

Gramsci riteneva che tutte le persone fossero uguali e che l'indipendenza delle donne in particolare avrebbe portato a diversi miglioramenti sociali.

Gramsci believed that everyone should be equal and that female independence in particular would have brought about different social improvements.

Ma, a causa delle sue convinzioni politiche, fu imprigionato dal regime fascista di Mussolini per lungo tempo.

But because of his political beliefs, he was imprisoned from the fascist regime of Mussolini for a long time.

Ammiro l'intelligenza di Antonio Gramsci e il suo impegno di attivista.

I admire the intelligence of Antonio Gramsci and his commitment to activism.

Nel film intitolato "Iron-Jawed Angels", la mia attrice preferita, Hilary Swank, recita la parte di Alice Paul, un'attivista del movimento di emancipazione femminile americano, che lottò in particolare per il diritto di voto delle donne.

In a movie called Iron-Jawed Angels, my favorite actress, Hilary Swank, plays the part of Alice Paul, an activist of the American women's emancipation movement, in particular for the struggle for the right for women to vote.

(In italiano le femministe di inizio secolo, di cui Alice era leader in America, si chiamano "suffragette").

(In Italian, the feminists of the second century, of which Alice was the leader in America, was called suffragists.)

Ammiro le persone come Alice Paul e Antonio Gramsci che credono in un mondo migliore.

I admire people like Alice Paul and Antonio Gramsci that believe in a better world.

Your task

Listen to the story in Italian and see how much you can catch now that you know the English.

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP77.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 10:14am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Transcript for the story:

Sono una femminista.

Credo fermamente nell'uguaglianza e nella parità di diritti per tutti.

Ma intendiamoci: non ho intenzione di bruciare il reggiseno e ammetto che mi piacciono gli uomini.

Secondo me, nonostante ci sia una divergenza di opinioni su questo tema, molte persone capiscono la verità.

Alcuni mesi fa, ho letto di Antonio Gramsci, un italiano vissuto durante il fascismo e la dittatura di Mussolini.

Gramsci riteneva che tutte le persone fossero uguali e che l'indipendenza delle donne in particolare avrebbe portato a diversi miglioramenti sociali.

Ma, a causa delle sue convinzioni politiche, fu imprigionato dal regime fascista di Mussolini per lungo tempo.

Ammiro l'intelligenza di Antonio Gramsci e il suo impegno di attivista.

Nel film intitolato "Iron-Jawed Angels", la mia attrice preferita, Hilary Swank, recita la parte di Alice Paul, un'attivista del movimento di emancipazione femminile americano, che lottò in particolare per il diritto di voto delle donne.

(In italiano le femministe di inizio secolo, di cui Alice era leader in America, si chiamano "suffragette").
Ammiro le persone come Alice Paul e Antonio Gramsci che credono in un mondo migliore.

Vocabulary Speed-Dates: vissuto, il fascismo, la dittatura, riteneva, l'indipendenza, i miglioramenti sociali

  • vissuto - {verb: vivere} - lived

  • il fascismo - fascism

  • la dittatura - dictatorship

  • riteneva - {verb: ritenere} - believe, consider, hold to be true

  • l'indipendenza - independence

  • i miglioramenti sociali - social improvements

Key phrases: alcuni mesi fa, ritenere che…

  • Alcuni mesi fa - Some months ago

  • Ritenere che - To believe that…

Grammar Bomb: fossero, avrebbe portato

  • Fossero comes from the verb “essere” and it's in the imperfect subjunctive.

  • Avrebbe portato - could have brought about.. from the passato condizionale, which is used to express thoughts like “could have done” “would have danced” “would have seen” and is created by using the conditional forms of avere/essere and the past tense.

Your task

Turn the vocab speed dates/phrases into post it notes. Then post them in your bathroom or you room for the week.

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Click to tweet: Just went on Italian vocab speed dates w/ vissuto, la dittatura, riteneva, & l'indipendenza @icebergproject

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP76.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 10:07am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Transcript for the story:

Sono una femminista.

Credo fermamente nell'uguaglianza e nella parità di diritti per tutti.

Ma intendiamoci: non ho intenzione di bruciare il reggiseno e ammetto che mi piacciono gli uomini.

Secondo me, nonostante ci sia una divergenza di opinioni su questo tema, molte persone capiscono la verità.

Alcuni mesi fa, ho letto di Antonio Gramsci, un italiano vissuto durante il fascismo e la dittatura di Mussolini.

Gramsci riteneva che tutte le persone fossero uguali e che l'indipendenza delle donne in particolare avrebbe portato a diversi miglioramenti sociali.

Ma, a causa delle sue convinzioni politiche, fu imprigionato dal regime fascista di Mussolini per lungo tempo.

Ammiro l'intelligenza di Antonio Gramsci e il suo impegno di attivista.

Nel film intitolato "Iron-Jawed Angels", la mia attrice preferita, Hilary Swank, recita la parte di Alice Paul, un’attivista del movimento di emancipazione femminile americano, che lottò in particolare per il diritto di voto delle donne.

(In italiano le femministe di inizio secolo, di cui Alice era leader in America, si chiamano "suffragette").
Ammiro le persone come Alice Paul e Antonio Gramsci che credono in un mondo migliore.

Vocabulary Speed-Dates: fermamente, uguaglianza, parità di diritti, reggiseno, divergenza, tema, ammetto, nonostante

  • fermamente - firmly, resolutely

  • uguaglianza - equality

  • parità di diritti - equal rights

  • il reggiseno - bra

  • la divergenza - disagreement, divergence

  • ammetto - {verb: ammettere} - allow, permit, acknowledge, admit

  • nonostante - despite, even though, although

  • il tema - theme

Notice that tema here ends with an -a, but it’s masculine.

Key phrases: intendiamoci, secondo me

  • Intendiamoci - Let’s set this straight.

    • Capiamoci - But understand.

  • Secondo me - According to me

When you use “secondo me,” it’s great because you can avoid using the subjunctive tense if you don’t know how to use it or you’re not comfortable. Of course though I recommend using the subjunctive when you can.

Read: The Present Subjunctive Tense in Italian (or the tense that even Italians are confused about)

Grammar Bomb: nell’uguaglianza, nella parità, non ho intenzione di bruciare

The first two are preposizioni articolate. Basically they’re what happens when an article and a preposition combine, or get married as I like to say.

Here in + l’ feminine and in + la combine.

Read: Articulated Prepositions {or the baby makin' magic that happens when an article marries a preposition}

Non ho intenzione di bruciare-

Pointing this out because of the preposition. When you want to say something like I have no intention OF burning -- with that infinitive after - you would either use "di" or "a" It's really specific with each verb, so you just have to learn them.

Your task

No matter what you level you’re at, brush up on your prepositions - a, da, in, su, per, tra/fra, con by reading the article below.

Resources mentioned:

Simple Prepositions in Italian {or why the smallest words hurt the most}

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Click to tweet: Just went on Italian vocab speed dates w/ fermamente, uguaglianza, parità di diritti. #iloveitalian @icebergproject

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP_75.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 10:00am PDT

Remember Smeagol from Lord of the Rings?

How could you forget him, right?

He’s also carrying on saying “MY PRECIOUS! IT’S MINE!” with his endearingly creepy face and raspy Smeagol voice.

The clip above, which you can watch here on Youtube, is all in Italian and is the PERFECT example for how possessive adjectives and pronouns work.

They’re pretty simple as there isn’t a basketful of rules for irregularities, so yay for accommodating grammar!

When to use them

  • To show ownership
  • To show a relationship

Here’s what they look like

Singular

  • MINE

Masculine - il mio
Feminine - la mia

Possessive Pronouns and Adjectives in Italian (or how to talk about what’s yours)Il mio melo - My apple tree
La mia famiglia - My family

  • YOURS

Masculine - il tuo
Feminine - la tua

Il tuo libro - Your book
La tua borsa - Your purse

  • HIS/HERS/ITS

Masculine - il suo
Feminine - la sua

il suo piatto - His plate
la sua email - Her email

  • OURS

Masculine - il nostro
Feminine - la nostra

il nostro cane - our dog
la nostra felicità - our happiness

  • YOURS

Masculine - il vostro
Feminine - la vostra

il vostro giardino - your garden
la vostra macchina - your car

  • THEIRS

Masculine - il loro
Feminine - la loro

il loro ufficio - their office
la loro camera - their room

Cocktail party fact: When you want to say ‘to my house,’ you WOULD NOT say ‘a mia casa’, but ‘a casa mia.’ You could do this with all of the others except for 'nostro.'

Plural

  • Masculine - i miei
  • Feminine - le mie

i miei amici - my friends
le mie amiche - my friends

  • Masculine - i tuoi
  • Feminine - le tue

i tuoi libri - your books
le tue borse - your purses

  • Masculine - i suoi
  • Feminine - le sue

i suoi piatti - his plates
le sue email - her emails

  • Masculine - i vostri
  • Feminine - le vostre

i vostri giardini - your gardens
le vostre sorelle - your sisters

  • Masculine - i nostri
  • Feminine - le nostre

i nostri cani - Our dogs

le nostre macchine - Our cars

  • Masculine - i loro
  • Feminine - le loro

i loro zii - their uncles
le loro camere - their rooms

How they work

Let’s say you’re talking about a ring. The word for ring in Italian is ‘annello’, which means that it’s masculine and singular.

Have no idea what I’m talking about when I say masculine and singular? Read this article. [link to article on gender/number agreement]

You would find the match for masculine + singular in the list, which is ‘il mio’ and you would add that before ‘annello’, making it ‘il mio annello.’

You absolutely need the article (il/la/lo/i/le/gli) when you use a possessive.

And to be clear, you NEVER use yourself to make the whatever you own or whoever you have a relationship with agree in number and gender, but you use the noun or the person you have a relationship to do so.

HOWEVER When Smeagol is talking to himself in the clip above, he says “È nostro! NOSTRO!” Meaning “(the ring) It’s ours! OURS!”

He doesn’t need to use an article hear because he says: “It’s ours!” as opposed to “The ring is ours!”

Fai attenzione!

The only time you wouldn’t use the article before the possessive and the noun is when you are talking about a singular family member.

Per esempio, to say ‘my sister,’ you would say ‘mia sorella.’

  • My brother - Mio fratello
  • Your uncle - Tuo zio
  • His dad - Suo padre
  • Our aunt - Nostra zia
  • Your (female) cousin - Vostra cugina

Attenta! Their mom - La loro madre

Loro ALWAYS takes an article.

Cocktail party fact: BUT when you use those little word endings to show affection, like -ino/ina, you need to use the article. Per esempio - La mia sorellina - My dear little sister.

One final point

If a preposition (on, at, of - su, a, da, etc.) comes before the article, then they need to marry each other.

Per esempio

  • In la mia storia --> nella mia storia - In my story
  • di la tua fantasia --> della tua fantasia - From your fantasy
  • in il suo sogno - nel suo sogno - In his dream

Need to brush up on your prepisizione articolate? Read this article here.

Want to finally be conversational in Italian? Find Mango Languages at your library.


MangoLogo_CherHaleMango’s online and mobile language-learning programs are available for free through thousands of libraries. That means free access to Italian courses online and on your phone or tablet.

Mango’s conversational approach will get you talking ASAP. That’s the most fun part, right?

It’s not just Italian though! You can learn over 60 languages (including English as a second language). You can even learn while watching foreign language films like the Italian films “Days and Clouds” and “Corpo Celeste.”

Visit icebergproject.co/mango and type in your zip code to see if your library offers Mango Languages.

If not, let your librarian know you’d love to learn with Mango Languages.

Questions? Drop ‘em in the comments below.

Direct download: ICE_EP74.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 1:02pm PDT

When you go shopping at a market in Italy, you're going to need a handful of phrases so you can actually get what you're looking for and avoid looking incredibly lost.

So I've compiled a short (but valuable) list of 7 key phrases + 22 vocabulary words to help make your trip that much easier.

7 Italian Phrases for Shopping at a Market in Italy

Dove posso comprare (il formaggio)?

DOH-veh POHS-so kohm-PRAR-eh

Where can I buy (cheese)?

Vorrei comprare (il pane).

VOR-reh kohm-PRAR-eh eel PA-neh

I would like to buy (the bread).

Quelli come si chiamano?

KWEHL-lee KO-meh see key-AMA-no

What are those called?

Mi dà un chilo di (patate) per favore?

me DA oon KEY-low dee pa-TAH-teh pear fah-VOR-eh

Can I have one kilo of potatoes, please?

Quanto costa al chilo?

KWAN-toe COAST-ah al KEY-low

What is the cost per kilo?

Travel tip: When you go to small stores or supermarkets in Italy and want to buy fruit or vegetables, it's necessary that you grab a plastic glove next to the plastic bags to choose your fruit. You also need to take what you've chosen and weigh it on a scale. You can choose the item from a list of buttons and then the sticker will print out for you to be put onto the bag.

Avete (la pasta)?

ah-VEH-teh la PAH-stah

Do you have (pasta)?

Dove sono i (broccoli)?

DOH-veh SO-no ee BRO-ko-lee

Where can I find the (broccoli)?

Basics

il riso

eel REE-zo

rice

riso

i fagioli

ee fa-JOE-lee

beans

le spezie

leh spez-EE-eh

spices

La frutta

lah FROO-tah

fruit

La frutta

la carne

lah CAR-neh

meat

le verdure

ley vare-DUR-eh

vegetables

il pesce

eel PESH-eh

fish

i frutti di mare

ee FROO-tee dee MAR-eh

seafood

le noci

leh NO-chee

nuts

la frutta secca

lah FROO-tah SEHK-ka

dried fruit

le erbe aromatiche

leh AIR-beh ah-ro-MAHT-ee-keh

herbs

il latte

eel LAH-teh

milk

milk

il formaggio

eel for-MA-jee-oh

cheese

il burro

eel BURR-oh

butter

lo yogurt

low YO-gurt

Yogurt

le uova

leh WHOA-vah

eggs

il pane

eel PA-neh

bread

la torta

lah TOR-tah

cake

torta

le bevande

leh beh-VAHN-deh

drinks

l’acqua

LOCK-wah

water

il vino rosso

eel VEE-no ROW-so

red wine

il vino bianco

eel VEE-no bee-AHN-ko

white wine

Want to finally be conversational in Italian? Find Mango Languages at your library.

MangoLogo_CherHaleMango’s online and mobile language-learning programs are available for free through thousands of libraries. That means free access to Italian courses online and on your phone or tablet.

Mango’s conversational approach will get you talking ASAP. That’s the most fun part, right?

It’s not just Italian though! You can learn over 60 languages (including English as a second language). You can even learn while watching foreign language films like the Italian films “Days and Clouds” and “Corpo Celeste.”

Visit icebergproject.co/mango and type in your zip code to see if your library offers Mango Languages.

If not, let your librarian know you’d love to learn with Mango Languages.

Curious about any other phrases/words related to shopping at a supermarket? Drop 'em in the comments below!

 

Direct download: ICE_EP73.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 12:56pm PDT

With the New Year just behind us, I thought it would be fitting to introduce the future tense to you.

The tense that expresses all that you see possible in the coming years, that lets you pour out your resolutions, your plans to any Italian willing to listen.

When to use it

Just like in English, we use the future tense to express the things that may happen in the future.

The present tense

Future Tense in Italian (or how to fall head-over-heels in love with the future tense)Just like in English as well, we can use the present tense to talk about the near future.

In English, we’ll say: “I’m going tomorrow.” or “I’m reading that book next week.”

Italian has the same construction.

Per esempio [same meaning as the English examples above]: “Vado domani.” or “Leggo questo libro la settimana prossima.”

You will always place a word that marks time before or after the present tense verb.

Other time words

  • Dopodomani – The day after tomorrow
  • L’anno prossimo – Next year
  • Il mese prossimo – Next month
  • Fra un anno – In one year
  • Fra cinque giorni – In five days
  • Fra poco – In a little bit

How to use it

In order to form the future tense, you must drop the -e at the end of every verb and place one of the six possible endings.

The endings are:

  • -&ò
  • -ai
  • -emo
  • -ete
  • -anno

dare (to give)

  • darò
  • darai
  • darà
  • daremo
  • darete
  • daranno

fare (to make, do)

  • farò
  • farai
  • farà
  • faremo
  • farete
  • faranno

Farai la colazione per tutta la famiglia? - Will you make breakfast for the whole family?

stare (to stay, to be)

  • starò
  • starai
  • starà
  • staremo
  • starete
  • staranno

Si ammalerà se starà fuori tutto il giorno mentre piove. - He will get sick if he (will) stay outside all day while it rains.

Fai attenzione (Pay attention!)

When you have a verb that ends in -are, like amare (to love), you must change the -a within -are to an -e. So, conjugating amare would look like this:

  • amerò
  • amerai
  • amerà
  • ameremo
  • amerete
  • ameranno

Other unusual changes to know

To make sure that it sounds pretty when you say it, four types of verbs experience a spelling change when forming the future tense.

These verbs are the ones that end in:

  • -care
  • -ciare
  • -gare
  • -giare

Faticare (to work hard, struggle)

  • faticherò
  • faticherai
  • faticherà
  • faticheremo
  • faticherete
  • faticheranno

Abbracciare (to hug, embrace)

  • abbraccerò
  • abbraccerai
  • abbraccerà
  • abbracceremo
  • abbraccerete
  • abbracceranno

Spiegare (to explain)

  • spiegherò
  • spiegherai
  • spiegherà
  • spiegheremo
  • spiegherete
  • spiegheranno

Assaggiare (to taste, to sample)

  • assaggerò
  • assaggerai
  • assaggerà
  • assageremo
  • assaggerete
  • assaggeranno

Gli esempi

  • Visiteremo il duomo a Firenze. – We will visit the duomo in Florence.
  • Mangerò la torta di mele con i miei. – I will eat apple pie with my parents.
  • Te lo darò. – I will give it to you.
  • Leggerete quegli articoli a scuola. – You will read those articles at school.
  • Partiranno per Milano dopo che Maria avrà finito la scuola. – They will leave for Milan after Maria has finished school.
  • Frodo comincerà a camminare verso Mordor. – Frodo will start walking to Mordor.

Hm. That’s oddly specific.

When using the words appena (just, as soon as), quando(when), or se (if), you can use the future tense in the most important part of the sentence and the next most important part of the sentence.

  • Mi telefonerà (non) appena arriverà negli Stati Uniti. – He will call me as soon as he arrives in the US.
  • Ti leggerò il libro se sarai bravo oggi. – I will read you the book if you’re good today.
  • La darà il pacchetto quando lei finirà il lavoro. – He will give her the package when she completes the job.

Irregular verbs

And of course, there are always going to be the lovely irregular verbs, the rebellious misfits.

Here are 13 of the most important to know.

Essere (to be)

  • sarò
  • sarai
  • sarà
  • saremo
  • sarete
  • saranno

Sarò contenta quando lui partirà. – I will be happy when he leaves.

Andare (to go)

  • andrò
  • andrai
  • andrà
  • andremo
  • andrete
  • andranno

Andranno a Torino in treno. – They will travel to Torino by train.

Avere (to have)

  • avrò
  • avrai
  • avrà
  • avremo
  • avrete
  • avranno

Avremo paura se Berlusconi si candiderà alle elezioni. – We will be scared if Berlusconi runs for office.

Dovere (should, must)

  • dovrò
  • dovrai
  • dovrà
  • dovremo
  • dovrete
  • dovranno

Dovrai venire in discoteca con noi se vorrai vedere Michele ballare. – You will have to come to a nightclub with us if you want to see Michael dance.

Potere (to be able to, can)

  • potrò
  • potrai
  • potrà
  • potremo
  • potrete
  • potranno

Pensi che potranno venire con noi al mercato? – Do you think they will be able to come with us to the market?

Sapere (to know)

  • saprò
  • saprai
  • saprà
  • sapremo
  • saprete
  • sapranno

Quando saprai i risultati del tuo esame? – When will you know your exam’s results?

Vivere (to live)

  • vivrò
  • vivrai
  • vivrà
  • vivremo
  • vivrete
  • vivranno

Vivrò comunque una serata speciale. – However, I’ll experience a special night. [source]

Volere (to want)

  • vorrò
  • vorrai
  • vorrà
  • vorremo
  • vorrete
  • vorranno

Sicuramente, vorranno diventare genitori al più presto. – Obviously, they’ll want to be parents as soon as possible.

Venire (to come)

  • verrò
  • verrai
  • verrà
  • verremo
  • verrete
  • verranno

Verranno alla mostra perché amano l’arte. – They will come to the show because they like art.

Bere (to drink)

  • berrò
  • berrai
  • berrà
  • berremo
  • berrete
  • berranno

Berrò vino rosso quando avrò sedici anni. – I will drink red wine when I am 16 years old.

What you need to pay attention to in the pronunciation

There are four areas that could change meaning for you that you must remember.

Let’s take the verb essere.

Essere (to be)

  • sarò –> Always place the stress on this final o. Make it obvious.
  • sarai
  • sarà –> –> Always place the stress on this final a. Make it obvious.
  • saremo –> Notice how there is ONE ‘m’ here. In the conditional tense, there are TWO.Make sure to place extra emphasis on the TWO ‘m’s’ in the conditional tense so you don’t get them confused. [stress on the "e"]
  • sarete - stress is on the “e”
  • saranno –> Make sure you pronounce those lovely double n’s. ALWAYS. The stress is on the SECOND “a.”

Your task

Practice these verbs out loud by having a mini-conversation with yourself. Take three minutes and talk to yourself about what three things you’re planning on doing next month.

Any questions/comments? Drop ‘em in the comments below.

Direct download: ICE_EP_72.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 11:31am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Similar to our episode on Natale in December, we decided to do another themed podcast episode on doing Valentine's Day Italian style.

[070] 32 Italian Valentine's Vocabulary and Pick-Up Phrases [Due Ragazze Pazze]You can visit Melissa's post, which includes both transcripts from our Italian guests in Italian and English, at her site here.

  • Fidanzato - boyfriend
  • Fidanzata - girlfriend
  • Fidanzarsi - to get engaged
  • La coppia - the couple
  • Un appuntamento - a date (or you could say un appuntamento romantico)

If someone stands you up for your appuntamento, they call it dare buca.

  • Amore - love
  • amante – lovers

You can also be an amante of something – like musica or cani – music or dogs.

  • Ti va di uscire qualche volta - Do you want to go out sometime?
  • Ho una cotta per te. - I have a crush on you.
  • Inammorarsi - to fall in love (mi sono innomorata di te)
  • Sono innamorata di te. - I am in love with you.
  • Sei l’uomo più bello che abbia mai visto./Sei la donna più bella che abbia mai vista. –You are the most handsome guy/beautiful woman that I have ever seen.
  • Sei la mia anima gemella. – You are my soulmate.
  • Colpo di fulmine – love at first sight
  • il romanticismo - romantic
  • Una a lume di candela - a candle light dinner
  • il cuore - the heart
  • il mio cuore batte più velocemente. - my heart beats faster
  • Non posso vivere senza di te! - I can’t live without you
  • Un mazzo di rose - a bouquet of roses (a little memory trick to remember “mazzo” bouquet from “mazza” baseball bat : I think of the final “o” in “mazzo” as the open vase to put the flowers)
  • Sei stato/a un bellissimo spreco di tempo. – You were a beautiful waste of time.

Lui - "Ma tu assomigli moltissimo alla mia quarta ragazza."

Lei - "Oh, ma quante ne hai avute?"

Lui - "Tre!"

Lui - “Mi indicherest la direzione?

Lei - “Quale direzione?

Lui - “Quella per il tuo cuore”

  • Lui - “Complimenti alla tua mamma” - Compliments to your mother.
  • Lui - “Ho perso il mio numero di telefono, potrebbe prestarmi il suo? - I lost my telephone number, could I borrow yours?
  • Lui - “Ci vieni spesso qui?” - Do you come here often?
  • Lui - “Nel cielo manca un angelo?" - Is heaven missing an angel?
  • Lui - (con le mani sulle scapole di una ragazza) “Oh, ma queste sono scapole, pensavo che fossero delle ali!” - Oh, but these are shoulders. I thought they were wings!
  • Lui - “Aspetti qualcuno?” - Are you expecting someone?
  • Lui -“Andiamo da te o da me?" - Your place or mine?
  • Lui -“Scusami, mi ero perso nei tuoi occhi.” - Pardon me, I was lost in your eyes.

Direct download: ICE_EP_70.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 3:37pm PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

How Krista Ricchi Navigated Becoming an Expat in Italy & Mastered the Italian Language
Photo credit: Leela Cyd

After Krista studied abroad, she had the pleasure of doing what so many American girls visiting Italy fantasize about. She fell in love, fiddled with a long-distance relationship while she finished university and then moved right back to Florence where she fell in love and got married.

But I'm giving away her story.

Krista Ricchi is the creator of the site Alla Fiorentina, where she blogs about food, fashion and culture in gorgeous Firenze.

Listen in to hear about her story + her experience learning (& mastering) Italian over the past five years.

You’ll learn:

  • How Krista managed her Italian when she was forced to speak all Italian at her first office job in Italy

  • Her top three methods for acquiring Italian (& I promise you'll love the one about CSI)

  • Three of her favorite things to do in Florence throughout the year
  • Two funny phrases Italians use for people who are crazy
  • The biggest struggle she faced when learning Italian that she continues to overcome

My favorite articles from Alla Fiorentina

Connect with me and Krista

Site: http://allafiorentina.com

Twitter: @allafiorentina

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/allafiorentina

Instagram: http://instagram.com/allafiorentina

I love THIS picture from her Instagram.

Have an extra ten seconds? Say hi to me and Krista on Twitter by pressing the click to tweet below!

Just listened to the interview btwn @icebergproject & @allafiorentina. Grazie for the #langlearning tips!

Photo credit to Leela Cyd

Direct download: ICE_Ep69.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 3:11pm PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

[068] How to Talk About Foreign Languages and Cultures: Mini-Story Pt. 5

Vocabulary Speed-Dates:Cartesio, significa, il dialetto, comprendere, legati

  • Cartesio - Name for Rene Descartes
  • Significa comes from the verb SIGNIFICARE - to mean, signfiy
  • Il dialetto - dialect
  • Comprendere - understand, include, consist of
  • Legato - united, linked

Grammar Bomb: ha detto, vorrei capire come funziona l’universo;

Ha detto - He/she/It said - Past tense

Ha comes from avere - Detto comes from dire.

Read: Italian Past Tense (Because Even Though We Shouldn't Live in It, We Need to Talk About It)

vorrei capire come funziona l’universo - {In Italian speak} I would like to understand how functions the universe.

This isn’t a typical sentence in English, obviously. But it happens often in Italian. So as I mentioned in a previous episode, keep embracing Italian articles, music, movies + shows so you can get a feel for the structure and quiet your inner literal translator, that person who wants to translate everything word for word in Italian.

Resources mentioned:

Connect with me

Direct download: ICE_EP68.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 1:17pm PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

[067] How to Talk About Foreign Languages and Cultures: Mini-Story Pt. 4

Vocabulary Speed-Dates: la meccanica quantistica, Infine, mi sembrano, furbo

  • La meccanica quantistica - Quantum mechanics {if you&'re nerdier, you'll appreciate this to drop in conversation or when having a chat with that renowned Italian physicist}
  • Infine - Finally
  • Mi sembrano comes from the verb sembrare and has the ‘mi in front of it to mean - It seems to me.
  • Furbo - clever

Here's a fun story for you. My ex-ragazzo, whom I haven't called Voldemort in a long time on this podcast, was described as furbo by almost everyone who knew him. Sure, he spoke five languages - including the very difficult Arabic - but furbo is more than that.

Italians say: “Furbo come una volpe.” - Clever like a fox, which means it has shades of being cunning or sly.

This is definitely the perfect word to describe him.

Key phrases: da tanto tempo che volevo impararlo/mi piacerebbe fare conversazione

  • da tanto tempo che volevo impararlo - I've wanted to learn it for a long time.
  • Mi piacerebbe fare conversazione. - The literal translator, which we want to avoid, in us would translate this as Voglio parlare, which isn't grammatically wrong, but it doesn't sound native Italian. To say Mi piacerebbe fare conversazione sounds more fluid and correct.

Grammar Bomb: mi piacerebbe fare conversazione con sua madre/la linguistica, il latino e il sanscrito perché sono le lingue base;

Notice the ‘sua here for the possession. Remember, when you're using the possessive to talk about relationships with a singular family member, you don't need to use the article {il, la, le, i}.

Read: Possessive Pronouns and Adjectives in Italian (or How to Talk About What's Yours)

la linguistica, Il latino e il sanscrito perché sono le lingue base - While it's easy to understand why sono is used here - to mean they are - it's a different story when you're actually talking to someone and trying to conjugate verbs at lightning speed in your head.

Sono is used here because there is more than one subject. In totale, there are three {linguistica, latino, sanscrito}

So when you talk about those three, you have to conjugate the form to reflect the third person plural, or the they form.

YOUR TASK

Resources mentioned:

Connect with me

Direct download: ICE_EP67.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 10:12am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

[066] How to Talk About Foreign Languages and Cultures: Mini-Story Pt. 3

TRANSLATION

Oggi parlerò della mia passione per tutto ciò che riguarda le lingue straniere.

Today I will talk about my passion for all foreign languages.

Si tratta principalmente di un elenco delle lingue che intendo imparare seguito da una breve descrizione dei motivi che mi spingono a farlo.

It's mostly a list of languages that I plan on learning following with a short description of the reasons why I am challenging myself to do it.

In totale, mi piacerebbe studiare quattordici lingue.

In all, I would like to learn fourteen languages. {This has actually changed, and I'm up to 25 in 25 years.}

Quest’anno studio l'italiano.

This year, I'm studying Italian.

L'anno prossimo, studierò il cinese, lo spagnolo messicano e la linguistica.

The following year, I will study Chinese, Mexican Spanish and Linguistics.

Poi il sanscrito, il coreano, il giapponese, il latino, il portoghese, l'arabo, il francese, il danese, e la matematica – probabilmente il calcolo differenziale – e, se avrò tempo, la meccanica quantistica.

Then Sanskrit, Korean, Japanese, Latin, Portuguese, Arabic, French, Danish, and math -- probably differential equations - and if I have time, quantum mechanics.

Infine, un po' sardo, di gallurese e di calabrese.

At the end, a little bit of the Sardegnian dialect, Gallurese and the Calabrian dialect.

Studio l'italiano perché amo la cultura, il cibo e la storia di questo paese;

I study Italian because I love the culture, the food and the history of this country;

il cinese perché sono taiwanese ed è da tanto tempo che volevo impararlo;

Chinese because I'm Taiwanese and I have wanted to learn it for a long time;

lo spagnolo messicano perché il mio ragazzo è messicano e mi piacerebbe fare conversazione con sua madre;

Mexican Spanish because my boyfriend is Mexican and I would like to have conversations with his mom;

la linguistica, il latino e il sanscrito perché sono le lingue base;

Linguistics, Latin and Sanskrit because they are foundational languages

il coreano e il giapponese perché mi piacciono le serie televisive e in particolare gli anime;

Korean and Japanese because I like the television series and in particular anime;

il danese perché mi piace la Danimarca e i danesi mi sembrano molto simpatici, buffi e furbi;

Danish because I like Denmark and the Danish are very nice, funny and clever;

la matematica, perché Cartesio ha detto che “capire la matematica significa capire il mondo” e io vorrei capire come funziona l'universo;

Mathematics because Rene Descartes said that “to understand math is to understand the world” and I would like the understand how the universe functions.

infine, il sardo, il gallurese e il calabrese perché mi piacciono i dialetti e vorrei comprendere come questi siano legati all'Italiano.

At the end, Sardo, Gallurese, and Calabrese because I like dialects and I would like to understand how they are linked to Italian.

YOUR TASK

Listen to the story again in all Italian and see how much of it you can understand.

Resources mentioned:

Connect with me

/p>

Direct download: ICE_Ep66.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 9:54am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

[065] How to Talk About Foreign Languages and Cultures: Mini-Story Pt. 2

Vocabulary Speed-Dates: In totale, quest'anno, lo spagnolo messicano, cinese

  • In totale - in total, in all
  • Quest'anno - This year
  • Lo spagnolo messicano - Mexican Spanish
  • cinese - Chinese

*Note here that you don't capitalize the names of languages in Italian. They're all lower-case.

Key phrases: In totale, mi piacerebbe studiare quattordici lingue./L'anno prossimo/se avrò tempo

We're looking at mi piacerebbe here, and this little bite of information comes from the lovely Dianne Hales, author of La Bella Lingua, who mentions in her book that an Italian guy asked her how she says “I want…”

She answered with “Voglio..,” which is grammatically correct, but not culturally correct if you're a lady. He said that she should be saying “Mi piacerebbe…” meaning “It would please me…” This phrase displays maturity over the more childish Voglio.

Se avrò tempo - If if I have time {in the future}

You can also say:

  • Se avrò più tempo…- If I have more time...
  • Se avrò del tempo… - If I have some time…

After these constructions, you would put some phrase of what you would do if you had more time. In this case, since avrò is future tense, the next verb should be in the future tense.

Grammar Bomb: studierò il cinese, lo spagnolo messicano e la linguistica.

I'm highlighting the future tense using the verb studiare here, which first person is conjugated as studierò - I will study.

{Notice something here - Studiare is spelled…, but when it's conjugated into the future tense that ‘a changes to an ‘e. This is important to remember as you conjugate verbs ending in -are in the future tense.}

When you have a verb that ends in -are, like amare (to love), you must change the -a within -are to an -e. So, conjugating amare would look like this:

  • amerò
  • amerai
  • amerà
  • ameremo
  • amerete
  • ameranno

Abbracciare (to hug, embrace)

  • abbraccerò
  • abbraccerai
  • abbraccerà
  • abbracceremo
  • abbraccerete
  • abbracceranno

YOUR TASK

Find 2-3 verbs ending in -are and conjugate them in the future tense.

Resources mentioned:

Future Tense in Italian (or How to Fall in Love with the Future Tense)

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP65.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 12:38am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

[064] How to Talk About Foreign Languages and Cultures: Mini-Story Pt. 1

Vocabulary Speed-Dates: Si tratta, intendo, i motivi, mi spingo

Si tratta comes from the reflexive verb TRATTARSI - to be about {something}

Intendo comes from the verb INTENDERE - to intend, to mean

il motivo is a masculine noun that means reasons or explanations

Mi spingono comes from the reflexive verb SPINGERSI - challenge oneself or push oneself

Key phrase: per tutto ciò che riguarda... - For all that concerns…

  • Per tutto ciò che riguarda le lingue straniere {like in the example}
  • Per tutto ciò che riguarda il mercato di lavoro - For everything that concerns the labor market/work market.

A synonym to this is Per quanto riguarda - That concerning/In regard to...

Grammar Bomb: Oggi parlerò della mia passione per tutto ciò che riguarda le lingue straniere.

We're looking at the very first verb in this sentence, which is parlerò. Parlerò is the first person of the future tense, meaning I WILL…, in this case, I WILL TALK/SPEAK.

Other verbs conjugated in the future tense are:

  • Sarò - I will be - from the verb ESSERE
  • Farò - I will do/make - from the verb FARE
  • Andrò - I will go - from the verb ANDARE

YOUR TASK

Resources mentioned

Future Tense in Italian (or How to Fall in Love with the Future Tense)

Reflexive Verbs in Italian (or the Tense That's All About You)

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Click to tweet: Just went on an Italian vocab speed-date with intendere, il motivo, spingersi, & trattarsi! Interested?

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_Ep64.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 12:33am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Quick + Dirty Cheat Sheet to Calabrese The grammar points below are from ItaliaDonna

  • "mb" and "nd" --> "mm" and "nn"
  • "fi" --> "hi"
  • "nf" --> "mp"
  • "gn" --> "un"

Gli esempi

  • Ci vediamo --> Indivirimu
  • Tre --> Tri
  • Fa freddo --> S'arripinna
  • Ma sei stupida? --> Ma sei storta?

The phrases below are from My Bella Vita

Calabrese Proverb:&“Lavùru fattu, dinàri aspetta.” --> “He who works, must be paid.”

Calabrese Proverb: “Si ‘un ti muovi ti mangianu i muschi.” -->“If you don't move, the flies will eat you.”

Resources Referenced:

  1. http://www.italiadonna.it/public/percorsi/02014/calabriad.htm
  2. http://mybellavita.com/2011/11/calabrian-history-luigi-lilio/
  3. http://mybellavita.com/2009/09/calabrese-proverbs/

Your task

Think of your favorite city in Italy. Do some research and learn a couple of facts about their dialect.

Direct download: ICE_EP63.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:03pm PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.  

Romanesco is characterized by its own unique words and a tendency to shorten standard Italian, which you’ll notice as I describe each transformation and new word.

This dialect is typically spoken in the Lazio region where I stayed and it still varies by city.

I stayed in Viterbo and they called their dialect Viterbesian, which overlapped with Romanesco.

While it’s not entirely likely that people will speak to you in dialect, you might hear it as people pass you by the on the street or you might encounter someone who does speak only in dialect, which I think is more likely to happen in the south.

Either way, it’s fun to know the dialects and I particularly enjoy them because I am a language nerd.

It’s officially called Romanesco by scholars, but you’ll hear all different names for it. In Urbe, a province in the north in Liguria, they call it Romanaccio.

They say that it’s one of the most widely known dialects since so much media comes out of Rome and that Italians all over the country speak some Romanesco as it’s been popularized.

Characteristics of Romanesco

  • il - er
  • Andiamo ragazzi - ‘Namo raga
  • Dove andiamo? - Do’ ‘namo?
  • Che facciamo? - Che famo?
  • Ci ho un a fame - C’ho una fame (I'm hungry) or C’ho tante cose da fare (I have a lot of things to do)
  • A bizzeffe - in gran quantità - in great quantity

Di storie così;, ne abbiamo raccolte a bizzeffe.

  • Mi’ nonno diceva: Meglio er sedere gelato che 'n gelato er sedere: non fidarti mai di chi non conosci bene - Don't trust who you don't know well.
  • S’e' fatta 'na certa - e tardi; dobbiamo andare - It's late; We should go.
  • Essere un dritto - Essere furbo - To be clever
  • Sei un gnocco - You are blockhead/stubborn.

'Tipo tosto - Stubborn person,' which we learned in episode 60, is also Romanesco.

Your task:

Go to Internazionale.it and read your horoscope in Italian. Use Wordreference to look up words you don't know yet.

Resources Mentioned:

Roman Dialect

Accademia Romanesca

Direct download: ICE_EP62.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 5:58pm PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.  

Making a reservation by phone

If you decide to call ahead before you book a room, which I recommend, here is a simple script of what your conversation might look like.

1.) Without pronunciation
Clerk: Pronto?

Hello?

You: Pronto. Vorrei prenotare una camera doppia per due notti dal 14 al 16 maggio, per favore.

Hi. I would like to book a double room for two nights from the 14th to the 16th of May, please.

Clerk: Volete due letti separati o un letto matrimoniale?

Would you like two separate beds or one double bed?

You: Un letto matrimoniale.

One double bed.

Clerk: Va bene.

Ok.

You: Quanto viene?

How much is it?

Clerk: Settantacinque euro a notte con colazione.

75 euros per night with breakfast.

You: È vicino al centro?

Is it near downtown?

Clerk:&Sì. Cinquecento metri.

Yes. 500 meters.

You:Perfetto. La prendo.

Perfect. I'll take it.

Clerk:Il suo nome?

Your name?

You:Jennifer Lawrence.

Clerk:Grazie.

Thank you.

You: Prego.

You're welcome.

Clerk: Prego. A presto.

You're welcome. Talk to you later.

You: Arrivederci!

Goodbye!

2.) With pronunciation

Clerk: Pronto?

PRAWN-toe

You: Pronto. Vorrei prenotare una camera doppia per due notti dal 14 al 16 maggio, per favore.

PRAWN-toe VOH-reh preh-no-TAR-eh OOH-nah KAH-mer-ah DOH-pee-ah pear DOO-eh NOTE-tee dal kwaht-TOR-dee-chee al SEH-dee-chee MAH-joe pear fah-VOR-eh

Clerk: Volete due letti separati o un letto matrimoniale?

voh-LEH-teh DOO-eh LET-tee seh-pah-RAH-tee oh oon LET-toe mah-tree-monee-AH-leh

You: Un letto matrimoniale.

oon LET-toe mah-tree-monee-AH-leh

Clerk: Va bene.

va BEH-neh

You: Quanto viene?

KWAN-toe VIEH-neh

Clerk: Settantacinque euro a notte con colazione.

seh-tahn-tah-CHEEN-kweh eh-UR-oh ah NOTE-teh cone cole-ah-TZEE-OH-neh

You: È vicino al centro?

eh vee-CHEE-no ahl CHEN-troh

Clerk: Sì. Cinquecento metri.

see cheen-kweh-CHEN-toe MEHT-ree

You: Perfetto. La prendo.

pear-FET-toe la PREHN-doh

Clerk: Il suo nome?

eel soo-oh NO-meh

You: Jennifer Lawrence.

Clerk: Grazie.

GRAH-tzee-eh

You: Prego.

PREH-go

Clerk: Prego. A presto.

PREH-go ah PRESS-toe

You: Arrivederci!

ah-ree-veh-DARE-chee

Other useful questions you might need to ask

C'è qualcosa di più economico?

cheh kwal-KO-zah dee pew eh-ko-NOMI-ko

Is there anything cheaper?

Il prezzo include la colazione?

eel PREH-tzoh een-CLUE-deh la cole-ah-TZEE-oh-neh
Does the price include breakfast?

YOUR TASK

Go dream hotel surfing on the internet for the number one city you want to stay in in Italy using the site Venere.com.

Direct download: ICE_EP61.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 9:59am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.  

Le frasi

Galeotto fu il libro

(gah-lee-OH-toe foo eel LEE-bro)

The act of matchmaking two people together. It comes from the idea that if you give a book to a guy to give to a girl, she’ll be interested in him and they’ll fall in love.

Promettere mari e monti

(pro-MET-er-eh mar-ee eh MOHN-tee)

Literally it means to promise the seas and mountains, but it figuratively means to promise someone everything. You could say Non mi prometti mari e monti or Mi ha promesso mari e monti.

Non mi chiedere la luna

(non me key-ed-ER-eh la LOO-nah)

Don’t ask me for the moon. It’s on the same vein as the previous phrase.

Andare a monte

(ahn-DAR-eh a MOHN-teh)

This literally means to go to the mountains, but it figuratively means that everything went poorly to the point of cancellation making it similar to the verb disdire - to annul or to cancel

Gli esempi

Un viaggio va a monte.

Il matrimonio è andato a monte.

Ne ho fin sopra i capelli

(neh oh feen SO-prah ee kah-PELL-ee)

This one sounds like something we would say in English and means I’ve had it up to here, like when you’re threatening someone that you’ve had enough of their BS. It literally means I have it up to my hair.

Capitare su un osso duro

(cap-ee-TAR-eh sue oon OH-so DER-oh)

This one means that you’re understanding how a person is. A person who is un osso duro is a stubborn person who is also slightly stupid. You would use this in a negative sense. Italians also do this cute thing where they tap their fist on the table when describing an osso duro. You could also describe someone as being un tipo tosto and mean the same thing.

Dare del filo da torcere

(DAR-eh del FEE-low da tor-CHEH-reh)

When you think of this phrase, think of the children who get to the ‘Why’ stage in their lives. You answer a question and they ask why and you answer a question and they ask why. A neverending cycle. They’re never satisfied with their answers. You could tell your friend that this is happening with your daughter by saying:

Mia figlia mi dà del filo da torcere

or

Mio figlio mi ha dato del filo da torcere.

It could also be in a positive sense like describing the child as very curious and therefore intelligent.

Essere in alto mare

(ESS-er-eh een AHL-toe MAR-eh)

According to my Italki teacher Giulia, this phrase is very used, and I could imagine Americans saying it a lot when they’ve procrastinated and are behind on projects/schoolwork. It literally means that you are in high water and very far from the coast. It figuratively means that you have a long way.

Per esempio

Non riesco fare i compiti per domani. Sono in alto mare.

Your task

Use one of these phrases in conversation today, even if you have to talk to yourself.

Resources mentioned:

Direct download: ICE_EP60.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 5:32pm PDT

[Podcast 59] When to Use the Imperfect Tense and When to Use the Past Tense in Italian

When to Use the Imperfect Tense and When to Use the Past Tense in Italian

So by now you know that you typically use the l'imperfetto (the imperfect tense) in Italian to describe things that habitually happened in the past and you use the passato prossimo (past tense) to describe an action that happened at a specific point in time in the past.

But I bet you've gone out and tried to apply those rules and realized that you keep getting corrected to use one tense or the other, which is such a bummer when you thought you knew what you were talking about.

Here's the good news (or the bad news depending on your perspective):

You might not ever know what you're talking about.

And that's okay!

Because we're not in this game to be right. We're in this game to have a good time, to experience Italy and to love love love how much pasta we eat.

But, if you do want to be wrong less often (because yes, it's more comfortable this way), I've put together a little guide to help you discern when to use both tenses.

Need to refresh your memory on the imperfect tense? Read this article.

Need to refresh your memory on the past tense? Read this article.

Oh, and to make you feel better, Italians learning English have the same problem with choosing past tenses.

The way of the world, I suppose.

Most obvious differences

  • The past tense uses 2 parts - You choose Essere or Avere to connect to the verb you want to express in the past. (Ho mangiato la pasta. - I ate the pasta.)
  • The imperfect tense ends in vo's and the past tense ends in a mixture of to's and so's.
  • The imperfect tense does not use any helping verbs like Essere or Avere.

Main differences

  • You use the imperfect tense to describe the weather or the time in the past.
  • You use the imperfect tense to describe how a person was feeling or thinking in the past
  • An action that someone was doing while another action had been completed or was still happening (Eating while she left)
  • You use the past tense to talk about an action that happened in the past that has been completed.

Less obvious differences

  • Some verbs in Italian change meaning when they're in the imperfect tense or the past tense.

A tutor on Italki, Maria, said:

Attenzione ad alcuni verbi che in italiano cambiano significato se sono usati all'imperfetto o al passato prossimo!

Be careful of some verbs in Italian that change meaning if they're used in the imperfect or past tense!

Per esempio - Sapere

In the present tense,sapere means to know how to do something, to have knowledge of something, or to be able to do something.

  • Abbiamo saputo - We found out, we heard (I imagine this as the gossipy one)

VS.

  • Sapevamo - We knew

And what's lovely is that they're friendly enough to exist together in the same sentence.

Ho saputo che sapeva la verità. - I found out that she knew the truth.

Altri esempi

  • Purtroppo, abbiamo saputo che non è andata così fino in fondo. - Unfortunately we found out that it didn't go that way in the end. [source]
  • Sapevo, soprattutto, che non dovevo innamorarmi di un uomo sposato. - I knew, above all, that I should not fall in love with a married man. [source]

Volere

  • Ho voluto - I wanted

VS.

  • Volevo - I wanted

Ho voluto parlarti stamattina. - I wanted to talk to you this morning (but I was not able to)

Volevo parlarti stamattina. - I wanted to talk to you this morning (and I may have/may have not succeeded)

Ho avuto la reazione che volevo e lo spirito è stato incredibile. - I got the reaction that I wanted and the spirit/energy was incredible. [source]

Ma io non ho voluto andarci, mica c'era qualcosa da chiarire. - But I did't want to go there as there was not anything at all to clarify. [source]

Potere

This one gets kind of confusing, so pay extra close attention.

Hanno potuto - They could [in the past without referencing a specific period of time]

VS

Potevano - They could [in the past referencing a specific period of time]

Italians prefer using the passato prossimo with potere when using a negative context, like you weren't able to do something and the consequences of that are still affecting you in the present.

You would use l'imperfetto with potere in a negative or positive context and gives the connotation that whatever you were/weren't able to do in the past wasn't a matter of ability but of choice AND the consequences that came from those choices stayed in the past and no longer affect you.

HOWEVER, within certain contexts this could surely change.

Altri esempi

  • Potevo fare di meglio - I could do it better (and I made the choice not to do it better) [source]
  • Non ho potuto fare di meglio - I couldn't do it better (I tried to make it better, but I couldn't succeed) [source]
  • E quando mi è arrivata la proposta non ho potuto dire di no. - And when I received the proposal, I couldn't say no. [source]
  • Potevano però continuare a guardare il paesaggio fuori dalla finestra. - They could, however, continue to look at the view from the window. [source]

Your Task: Create two sentences. The first using Sapevo and the second using Ho saputo. Put those sentences in the comments below this podcast episode!

Any questions? Drop 'em in the comments below!

Direct download: ICE_EP59.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 12:38pm PDT

Because I've been doing this Italian thing for awhile (&because I like lists), I have a list of tenses that I love in Italian.

The imperfect subjunctive is number two because I love the way all of the s's sound.

And because I can think up ridiculous scenarios and talk about them.

And ask everyone who speaks Italian a less realistic, more interesting version of 21 questions.

But how do you use this lovely s-filled, dreamy scenario tense?

When to use it

  • When the most important part of the sentence includes thepast tense, imperfect tense or the conditional tense
  • Talk about an unlikely hypothetical situation that starts withSe (If) like If I won the lottery…
  • After the wishful expression Magari (if only)

What it looks like

If you say goodbye to the -RE at the end of each verb, you can tack on these endings for regular verbs:

-ssi

-ssi

-sse

-ssimo

-ste

-ssero

Here are couple example verbs so you can see the big, wonderful picture.

Avere (ah-vare-ay) – to have

Avessi Avessimo

Avessi Aveste

Avesse Avessero

Avere imperfect subjunctive tense in Italian

Venire (vuh-neer-ay) – to come

Venissi Venissimo

Venissi Veniste

Venisse Venissero

Venire Italian Imperfect Subjunctive

Cominciare (ko-mean-char-ay) - to begin

Cominciassi Cominciassimo

Cominciassi Cominciaste

Cominciasse Cominciassero

Cominciare Imperfect Subjunctive Tense Italian

How to use it

Subject* + past/imperfect/conditional tense + che +imperfect subjunctive verb + last part of your magnificent sentence

  • Talk about an unlikely hypothetical situation that starts with Se (If) like If I won the lottery…

Se (If) + subject* + imperfect subjunctive tense + something lovely made up by you + conditional tense + some lovely ending to your sentence

  • After the wishful expression Magari (if only)

Magari + imperfect subjunctive tense + some fantastic ending

*Keep in mind that the subjects io and tu are spoken in this tense to remedy a misunderstanding since they have the same endings. The remaining subjects noi, voi, loro can be left off. Lui and lei can be left off if it's clear who you're talking about.

Gli esempi

  • Cher desiderava che tu studiassi l'italiano di più.
  • Vorremmo che guardaste il film francese.
  • Speravo che la vita fosse più facile.
  • Se fossi una giraffa, mangerei le foglie.
  • Se avessero tempo, imparerebbero a ballare.
  • Magari fosse vero.
  • Magari potessi venire da te.

Must-Know Irregular Verbs

Bere (bear-ay) – to drink

Bevessi Bevessimo

Bevessi Beveste

Bevesse Bevessero

Dare (dar-ay) – to give

Dessi Dessimo

Dessi Deste

Desse Dessero

Dire (deer-ay) – to say

Dicessi Dicessimo

Dicessi Diceste

Dicesse Dicessero

Essere (ess-ah-ray) – to be

Fossi Fossimo

Fossi Foste

Fosse Fossero

Fare (far-ay) – to do/to make

Facessi Facessimo

Facessi Faceste

Facesse Facessero

Stare (star-ay) – to be/stay

Stessi Stessimo

Stessi Steste

Stesse Stessero

Other useful articles


Your task: Create a sentence in the imperfect subjunctive using the verb Avere.

Leave a comment (lascia un commento)if you have any questions about this tense OR lascia un commento ;with one of your own examples using this tense!

Direct download: ICE_EP_58.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 12:35pm PDT

1