30 Minute Italian

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

[089] Riding in Small, Orange, Tattooed Cars in Italy Pt. 4

Vocabulary Speed-Dates

i carabinieri, ci hanno superati, abbiamo fermato, chiusa, delusa, perciò, mi sono addormentata, ancora

  • i carabinieri - the police {These are the officers that are a part of the army}
  • ci hanno superati {from the verb superare - to pass} they passed us
  • abbiamo fermato {from the verb fermare - to stop} we stopped
  • chiusa {usually chiuso} - closed
  • delusa - {usually deluso} disappointed
  • perciò - therefore
  • mi sono addormentata {from the verb addormentarsi} - to put oneself to sleep
  • ancora - still

Key phrases

per paura, per farli passare

  • Per paura - because of fear, for fear
  • Per farli passare - In order to let them pass

Grammar Bombs

You heard one in this sentence: Poi i carabinieri ci hanno superati e, per paura, abbiamo fermato la macchina per farli passare.

  • “Ci hanno superati” - They passed us.
  • “Ci” means “us.”
  • “Hanno superati” means “they passed.”
  • The “us” part of the sentence often goes before the verb and that's a really common way to structure Italian sentences.

In this case, it's an indirect object pronoun, and these types of sentences answer the question 'to what?' or 'to whom'

So in this case if you ask “to whom?” You would answer “to us.”

  • mi - me
  • ti - you
  • gli - him
  • le - her
  • ci - us
  • vi - you all
  • gli or loro - they (gli is used far more often, but loro is grammatically correct. With loro, you have to put it after the conjugated verb)

Your task

Create a couple of sentences on your own using indirect object pronouns.

Like - My told me that I am pretty or They told us to go to the store.

The word for pretty is simply “bella” and for store is “negozio.”

Resources mentioned

The Grand Difference Between Indirect and Object Pronouns (& yes you have to know them)

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Click to tweet: Just went on Italian vocab speed-dates w/ chiusa, delusa and ancora #italianmakesmesmile

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP90_.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 8:00am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

[089] Riding in Small, Orange, Tattooed Cars in Italy Pt. 4

Vocabulary Speed-Dates

eravamo stipati, le sardine, piccola, macchina, arancione, le cinture di sicurezza

  • eravamo stipati {from the verb stipare - to cram/overcrowd} - We were were crammed
  • Le sardine - sardines
  • Piccola - small
  • Macchina - car
  • Le cinture di sicurezza - seatbelts
  • arancione - orange

Key phrases

eravamo quattro, una pizzeria aperta, visto che avevamo fame, siamo andati via dalla cantina

  • Eravamo quattro - Essere + # to talk about number of people
  • Una pizzeria aperta - an open pizzeria
  • Visto che avevamo fame - Visto che + verb = Since, seeing that we were hungry
  • Siamo andati via da + - We went away from

Grammar Bombs

I want to point out a piece of grammar that is often confusing for many language learners and that's indirect and direct object pronouns.

You heard one in this sentence: Ci hanno detto che c'era una pizzeria aperta e, visto che avevamo fame, siamo andate con loro.

“Ci hanno detto” - They told us.

“Ci” means “us.”

“Hanno detto” means “they told.”

The “us” part of the sentence often goes before the verb and that's a really common way to structure Italian sentences.

In this case, it's an indirect object pronoun, and these types of sentences answer the question 'to what?'; or 'to whom?'/p>

So in this case if you ask “to whom?” You would answer “to us.”

  • mi - me
  • ti - you
  • gli - him
  • le - her
  • ci - us
  • vi - you all
  • gli or loro - they (gli is used far more often, but loro is grammatically correct. With loro, you have to put it after the conjugated verb)

Indirect object pronouns are used for verbs that have to do with giving.

These are verbs like: to give (dare), to offer (offrire), to send(mandare), to deliver (portare), to gift (regalare), to return (restituire), to lend, and to loan (prestare).

Your task

See if you can remember the list of indirect object pronouns.

Resources mentioned

The Colors in Italian (or how to talk about her bright red lips and his skintight white shirt)

The Grand Difference Between Indirect and Object Pronouns (& yes you have to know them)

Ten Ways to Laugh in Italian - from Mirella at Parlatè

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Click to tweet: Just went on Italian vocab speed-dates w/ le sardine, stipare and arancione. #italianmakesmehappy

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP89__.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

[088] Riding in Small, Orange, Tattooed Cars in Italy Pt. 3

TRANSLATION

C'erano due ragazzi che si chiamavano Alessio e Riccardo.

There were two guys named Alessio and Riccardo.

Ma io e le mie amiche avevamo dato loro un soprannome: i bambini.

But me and my friends had given them a nickname: the kids.

Perché avevano diciassette anni ma sembravano più grandi.

Because they were 17 years old but they acted older.

Ogni sera, bevevano e fumavano. E avevano tatuaggi.

Each night, they drank and they smoked. And they had tattoos.

Ma era solo per ridere perché gli adolescenti in Italia e negli stati uniti sono sempre così.

But this was only as a joke because all teenagers in Italy and the United States are always like this.

A Viterbo, in Italia, c'era un posto chiamato 'La Cantina' dove ogni martedì andavamo a ballare.

In Viterbo, In Italy, there was a place called 'The Cantina' where each Tuesday we went to dance.

I bambini erano sempre lì.

The kids were always there.

Dopo un po', abbiamo fatto amicizia con loro.

After a little bit, we became friends with them.

Una notte in particolare, siamo andati via dalla Cantina con i bambini. Avevano una piccola macchina arancione con due cinture di sicurezza.

One night in particular, we left the Cantina with the kids. They had a small, orange car with two seatbelts.

Ma eravamo quattro. Eravamo stipati come sardine.

There were four of us. We were smushed like sardines.

Ci hanno detto che c'era una pizzeria aperta e, visto che avevamo fame, siamo andate con loro.

They told us that there was an open pizzeria e since we were hungry we went with them.

Abbiamo ascoltato un po' di musica italiana come Entics, e ho sentito la canzone 'Quanto 6 Bella' per la prima volta.

We listened to a bit of Italian music like Entics, and I heard the song “Quanto sei bella” for the first time.

Poi i carabinieri ci hanno superati e, per paura, abbiamo fermato la macchina per farli passare.

Then the police passed by us and because we were scared we stop the car and let them pass.

Quando siamo arrivati, la pizzeria era chiusa e rimasi delusa.

When we arrived, the pizzeria was closed and I was disappointed.

Perciò sono andata a casa e mi sono addormentata anche se avevo ancora fame.

So I went home and and went to sleep even though I was still hungry.

Your task

Listen to the original story in Italian and see how much of the story you can understand after hearing it in English.

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Click to tweet:Just finished listening to the translation of a mini-story by @icebergproject about tiny, tattooed, orange Italian cars!

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP88.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

[087] Riding in Small, Orange, Tattooed Cars in Italy Pt. 2

Vocabulary Speed-Dates

bevevano, fumavano, gli adolescenti, un posto, lì

  • bevevano - {from the verb bere - to drink} they drank
  • fumavano - { from the verb fumare - to smoke} they smoked
  • gli adolescenti - adolescents
  • un posto - a place
  • - there
  • - there

Key phrases

ogni sera, solo per ridere, avevano tatuaggi, andavamo a ballare, dopo un po', abbiamo fatto amicizia con loro

  • Ogni sera - each night
  • Ogni martedì - each Tuesday
  • solo per ridere - only for a laugh
  • avevano tatuaggi - avere tatuaggi - to have tattoos
  • andavamo a ballare - andare a ballare - to go to dance
  • dopo un po' - after a while
  • abbiamo fatto amicizia con loro - fare amicizia con qualcuno - to make friends with someone

Grammar Bombs

andavamo a ballare, a Viterbo, in Italia, fare amicizia con loro

Here are the sentences that the verbs came from:

  • Ogni sera, bevevano e fumavano. E avevano tatuaggi.
  • Ma era solo per ridere perché gli adolescenti in Italia e negli stati uniti sono sempre così.
  • A Viterbo, in Italia, c'era un posto chiamato 'La Cantina' dove ogni martedì andavamo a ballare.
  • I bambini erano sempre lì.
  • Dopo un po' abbiamo fatto amicizia con loro.

We have a couple of verbs that take certain prepositions and then we have two location prepositions.

A Viterbo - It's a city, so we use “a.” If it's a city, a small island, or a town, you use “a.”

In Italian - It's a country, so we use “in.” If it's a country, a state, a big island, or a region, you use in

Your task

Practice your prepositions with locations!

Tell yourself where you live and where you want to go in the world using what you learned.

Resources mentioned

When to Use the Prepositions “a,” “in,” and “da”

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Click to tweet: Just went on Italian vocab speed-dates w/ fumavano, bevevano, gli adolescenti e un posto.

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP87.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 7:00am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Vocabulary Speed-Dates

ragazzi, chiamavano, amiche, dato, soprannome, sembravano, più grandi

  • ragazzi - guys
  • chiamavano - {from the verb chiamare} - to call
  • amiche - {from amico - feminine plural) - friends
  • dato - {from dare - to give} - gave
  • soprannome - nickname
  • sembravano {from the verb sembrare - to seem} seemed
  • Più grandi - older

Key phrases

c'erano, avere diciassette anni

  • C'erano - there was
  • C'ègrave; - There is
  • Ci sono - There are
  • C'era - There was
  • Avere diciassette anni - to be seventeen years old
  • Avere + age + anni
  • Sui + vent'anni - Around 21 years old

Grammar Bombs

Cerano, si chiamavano, avevamo dato, avevano, sembravano

Here are the sentences that the verbs came from:

  • C'erano due ragazzi che si chiamavano Alessio e Riccardo.
  • Ma io e le mie amiche avevamo dato loro un soprannome: i bambini.
  • Perché avevano diciassette anni ma sembravano più grandi.

As you might notice, these verbs are in two tenses: the imperfect tense and the preterite perfect tense.

Now these are slightly complicated tenses.

The imperfect is a past tense that is used to describe something that happened in the past that was an action that happened again and again or used to describe things like the weather or emotions in the past.

In daily conversation, Italian language learners often confuse it with the regular past tense, or the passato prossimo, as they say in Italian.

The preterite perfect tense, known as the trapassato prossimo in Italian, describes an action that happened in the past like “He had already gone to the movies,” or “She had already gotten her hair cut.”

It uses “had + past tense of the verb.”

In Italian, they use the verb “imperfect tense of avere or essere” + “the past tense of the main verb.”

In this case: “Avevamo dato.”

Ma io e le mie amiche avevamo dato loro un soprannome: i bambini. - But me and my friends had given them a nickname: the kids.

Your task

If you're at a beginning level, say your age and the ages of your immediate family members in Italian.

If you're a higher level in italian, retell a quick story to yourself of something that happened in the past using the imperfect tense.

Resources mentioned

Connect with me

Tweet me @icebergproject

Click to tweet: Just went on Italian vocab speed-dates w/ soprannome, ragazzi, dato e sembravano. #amolitaliano

Find me on Facebook to learn phrases, idioms, vocabulary and culture tips!

 

Direct download: ICE_EP_086.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 11:59am PDT

Like pithy sayings and puns, colors add a bit of pop to language.
I mean, how can you tell a proper story in Italian about that beautiful human being you spent all night with without describing what they were wearing, how they looked, and the color of the wine you drank.

The Colors in Italian (or how to talk about her bright red lips + his skintight white t-shirt)

Here are the colors in Italian

  • Red - rosso
  • Pink - rosa
  • Orange - arancione
  • Yellow - giallo
  • Green - verde
  • Blue - azzurro

CPF: The Italian translation for “Prince Charming” is “Il Principe Azzurro.”

  • Purple - viola, porpora {has more red in it}
  • Silver - argento
  • Gray - grigio
  • Gold - oro
  • Black - nero
  • Brown - marrone
  • White - bianco

If you want to talk about dark shades, you can just add the word 'scuro' at the end of each color.

  • Dark red - rosso scuro
  • Dark green - verde scuro

CPF: Blu on its own is usually understood as dark blue.

If you want to look at lighter shades, here are some examples:

  • Baby blue - celeste
  • Baby pink - rosa confetto

If you want to talk about light shades, you can just add the word 'chiaro' at the end of each color.

  • verde chiaro - light green

CPF: Azzurro on its own is usually understood as light blue.

Some slightly exotic precise descriptions of colors

  • Blood red - rosso sangue
  • Fire red - rosso fuoco
  • Hot pink - rosa shocking
  • Salmon pink - rosa salmone
  • Blue green - verdeazzurro
  • Emerald green - verde smeraldo
  • Forest green - verde bosco
  • Jade green - verde acqua
  • Lilac - lilla
  • Periwinkle - pervinca
  • Violet - violetto
  • Red-orange - rosso arancio
  • Maroon - bordeaux
  • Shiny/glossy red - rosso lucido
  • Hazel brown - nocciola

CPF: That's the same word for a hazelnut! - Nocciola

In English, we pick + choose certain colors for certain characteristics, and Italian is no different.

Which colors should you use in which situations?

  • Red - rosso

If you hear the term “bollino rosso” on the news, it means that a situation is dangerous or difficult. Terms of the same category are “bollino verde” meaning safe and “bollino giallo” meaning everything is okay, but it could change.

  • Bollino rosso” could also refer to a television or movie rating. We would see it as PG-13 or R.
  • Bollino giallo” would be okay for kids but require adult supervision.
  • Bollino verde” is perfect for kids.

Pink - Unlike other colors, you don't have to change the ending of “rosa” to match the object it's describing.

IT NEVER CHANGES.

CPF: “Rosa” is also used to describe a book or a movie that's for “chicks,” what we call a “chick flick” or “chick lit.”

  • Other expressions:
  • Gossip column - cronaca rosa
  • Newborn baby girl - fiocco rosa

CPF: They say this because it's tradition that when a newborn baby girl is born, they hang a pink bow on the door.

  • Cool as a cucumber - fresco come una rosa
  • Orange - arancione
  • Yellow - giallo

CPF: “Un giallo” is also a mystery novel or thriller.

  • Green - verde

In English, you might hear someone say that they don't have any green, meaning money. In Italian, you would express that as “grana.” And if you're talking about marijuana, it's 'erba'

You can also make someone “green with envy.” The expression is “rendere {qualcuno} verde di invidia."

Blue - azzurro, blu

When describing someone's eyes, it's more common to use "gli occhi azzurri."

CPF: If you’re feeling blue, or sad, you would use “triste.”

  • Purple - viola
  • Silver - argento

CPF: If you want to express that someone was born with a silver spoon in one’s mouth, you wouldn’t use the word silver in Italian. The expression is “nato con la camicia” - {literally} born with the shirt on

  • Gold - oro

This can be used to describe the color and the actual object.

Some expressions:

  • Heart of gold - cuore d’oro
  • Not all that glitters is gold - Non è tutto oro quel che luccica
  • Sweet dreams - sogni d’oro
  • Eligible bachelor - scapolo d’oro
  • Black - nero

CPF: If you want to describe something as black-and-white with colors, you can use “in bianco e nero.” If you want to say that something is straightforward using the expressions black-and-white, you would use “chiaro e tondo/nero su bianco.”

If you want to talk about a dark room or a dark night, you would use the word "buio."

  • al buio - in the dark
  • buio pesto - pitch black

CPF: Just like in English, you can keep someone in the dark, or keep information from someone, as well in Italian. “Non me lo ha detto. Ne sono all'oscuro.” - “She didn’t tell me. I’m in the dark.”

  • Brown - marrone

You would use marrone to describe the color of someone’s eyes - gli occhi marroni.

You would use castano to describe the color of someone’s hair - i capelli castani.

You could also use the expression “black sheep” meaning “a misfit” with the term“pecora nera.”

A slew of exceptions

A brown bear doesn’t use either of the words above. It’s a word all on its own “orso bruno.”

Similarly:

  • Brown sugar - zucchero di canna
  • Brown rice - riso integrale
  • White - bianco

Want to finally be conversational in Italian? FindMango Languages at your library.

MangoLogo_CherHaleMango’s online and mobile language-learning programs are available for free through thousands of libraries. That means free access to Italian courses online and on your phone or tablet.

Mango’s conversational approach will get you talking ASAP. That’s the most fun part, right?

It's not just Italian though! You can learn over 60 languages (including English as a second language). You can even learn while watching foreign language films like the Italian films “Days and Clouds” and “Corpo Celeste.”

Visit icebergproject.co/mango and type in your zip code to see if your library offers Mango Languages.

If not, let your librarian know you’d love to learn with Mango Languages.

Questions? Drop ‘em in the comments below!

Direct download: ICE_EP_85.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 9:17am PDT

Click play on the player at the bottom to listen to this podcast or listen to it on Stitcher or iTunes.

Sarah Dowling, founder of Italy Project 365, is one of those people who knows what's good for her soul + follows that path as soon as she hears the call.

After finishing university, she needed more than just a blog to keep her connected to Italy and then decided to move to Bologna.

In this episode, we chat about how she got to that point, what logistics she went through to get there, and how she's managed learning the language throughout it all.

You'll learn:

  • Two Sicilian words she heard from her nonna growing up
  • Two of the best ways to search for an apartment in Italy
  • How to get your visa + teach English in Italy
  • Sarah's favorite Florentine poet + singer-songwriter from Bologna
  • Which language school she recommends in Bologna
  • Her three favorite Italian phrases + words
  • How she FINALLY learned the subjunctive {il congiuntivo}

My favorite articles from Italy Project 365

Resources Mentioned

Get to know me and Sarah

Site: http://italyproject365.com/

Twitter: @italyproject @icebergproject

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/italyproject365

Have an extra ten seconds? Say hi to Sarah on Twitter by pressing the click to tweet below!

Loved the interview btwn @italyproject & @icebergproject. Great tips on moving to Italy + learning Italian!

Direct download: ICE_Episode84.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 12:06am PDT

The second anything Italian comes up, you can already feel Sarah's passion emanate the space. While growing up with Italian roots might have contributed, she cultivated her love of Italy after her first trip to her father's hometown.

Since then she's taken herself on a beautiful journey replete with funny language mistake anecdotes and opportunities to interact with the culture, which she writes about on her blog Not Just Another "Dolce Vita."

You're going to love this episode because you'll learn:

  • Her advice on finally mastering Italian prepositions and sentence structure [She's an Italian professor. She knows her stuff.]
  • Which four methods she used to immerse herself in the language while still at home in Canada
  • How she navigated the Italian workplace and adapted to a Sienese accent
  • Seven of her favorite Italian musicians
  • Three of her favorite Italian words/phrases
  • Three recommendations for reading material at the beginner + upper intermediate level

Resources Mentioned:

My favorite articles from Not Just Another "Dolce Vita"

NJADV ButtonGet to know me and Sarah

Site: http://notjustanotherdolcevita.wordpress.com/

Twitter: @s_mastroianni @icebergproject

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NotJustAnotherDolceVita

Have an extra ten seconds? Say hi to me and Sara on Twitter by pressing the click to tweet below!

Just listened to the interview btwn @icebergproject & @s_mastroianni. Grazie for the brilliant #langlearning tips!

Direct download: ICE_Episode_83.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 11:24pm PDT

[#] How to Get Your Visa and Work Abroad in Italy with Rick ZulloRick Zullo escaped to Italy and simultaneously fell in love with the city of Rome and an Italian lady.

What's amazing about his site, RickZullo.com, is that he writes a mixture of Italian culture, language, and travel without sugarcoating it.

He's real, honest, and funny.

You're going to love this episode because you'll learn:

  • The exact process of how he got his one-year visa for Italy and other options for getting visas
  • How to teach English and work in Italy as a teacher
  • How he met his wife and dealt with some cultural translation barriers
  • Main methods for learning grammar [and why avoiding the passato remoto came back to bite him in the butt]
  • Which methods he didn't find particularly helpful
  • His experience working as a teacher in Rome [unique to the stories you usually hear]

Resources Mentioned:

My favorite articles from Rick Zullo

Get to know me and Rick

RZulloSite: http://rickzullo.com/

Twitter: RickZullo1 @icebergproject

Facebook: Ricks Rome

 

 

 

Have an extra ten seconds? Say hi to me and Rick on Twitter by pressing the click to tweet below!

Just listened to the interview btwn @icebergproject & @rickzullo1. Grazie for the brilliant #langlearning tips!

Direct download: ICE_EP82.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 5:00am PDT

Lisa Condie, founder of Better Way Italy and contributor to Huffington Post, picked up her entire life and moved to Florence Italy in June of 2012.

How Lisa Condie of Better Way Italy Listened to Her Intuition and Permanently Moved to Florence, ItalyIt's a dream that many of us imagine but never take action to accomplish, and Lisa is living proof that it's possible AND introduces a whole lotta' joy into your life, which is what we're all about at The Iceberg Project.

So it was my absolute pleasure to chat with her about all things Italian to get her perspective and hear her story, which I know will resonate with you.

You'll learn:

  • What ultimately made Lisa decide to move to Florence, Italy full time
  • The differences in how Italians and Americans conduct business
  • Lisa's favorite phrases in Italian that always make Italian smile
  • What she would do on days when she was really discouraged with Italian
  • Which pieces of the language that she still struggles with
  • Her three favorite things to do in her city of Florence, Italy
  • How she started her tours in Tuscany and what makes them unique out of a sea of Italian tour groups
  • How she manages to roll with the Italian lifestyle when things go wrong

My favorite articles from Better Way toDSC_4120 Italy

Connect with Me & Lisa

Website: http://betterwaytoitaly.com/

Twitter: @betterwayitaly @icebergproject

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/betterwaytoitaly

Have an extra ten seconds? Say hi to Lisa on Twitter by pressing the click to tweet below!

Just listened to the interview btwn @icebergproject & @betterwayitaly. Grazie for the amazing story + tips!

Want to finally be conversational in Italian? FindMango Languages at your library.

MangoLogo_CherHaleMango's online and mobile language-learning programs are available for free through thousands of libraries. That means free access to Italian courses online and on your phone or tablet.

Mango's conversational approach will get you talking ASAP. That's the most fun part, right?

It's not just Italian though! You can learn over 60 languages (including English as a second language). You can even learn while watching foreign language films like the Italian films “Days and Clouds” and “Corpo Celeste.”

Visit icebergproject.co/mango and type in your zip code to see if your library offers Mango Languages.

If not, let your librarian know you'd love to learn with Mango Languages.

 

Direct download: ICE_Ep81.mp3
Category:Italian -- posted at: 4:02pm PDT